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Weddell Seal Gallery

Choose from 68 pictures in our Weddell Seal collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Weddell seal skull, Leptonychotes weddellii Featured Weddell Seal Print

Weddell seal skull, Leptonychotes weddellii

Specimen collected by Robert Falcon Scotts British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913, also known as the Terra Nova expedition. It had a broad scientific programme and collected thousands of geological and zoological specimens. The Weddell seal is found in coastal areas of the Antarctic mainland and some sub-Antarctic islands. It relies on holes in the ice for breathing and accessing water, and uses its teeth to create the holes and keep them open. Date: 1910

© Mary Evans / Natural History Museum

A full length, colour image of a grey and black Weddell Seal Featured Weddell Seal Print

A full length, colour image of a grey and black Weddell Seal

A full length, colour image of a dappled grey and black Weddell Seal from above, basking on top of the snow, in Antarctica. The seal is facing towards the camera, lying in a prone position, with its flippers outstretched. Weddell seals belong to a group of seals known as Phocidae or true seals. This image was shot while filming Mawson - Life and Death in Antarctica 2008

© NFSA. All Rights Reserved.

A Weddell Seal Getting On To The Ice, November 1911, (1913). Artist: Herbert Ponting Featured Weddell Seal Print

A Weddell Seal Getting On To The Ice, November 1911, (1913). Artist: Herbert Ponting

A Weddell Seal Getting On To The Ice, November 1911, (1913). A Weddell seal climbs out of a hole onto the ice. The final expedition of British Antarctic explorer Captain Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) left London on 1 June 1910 bound for the South Pole. The Terra Nova Expedition, officially the British Antarctic Expedition (1910-1913), included a geologist, a zoologist, a surgeon, a photographer, an engineer, a ski expert, a meteorologist and a physicist among others. Scott wished to continue the scientific work that he had begun when leading the Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04. He also wanted to be the first to reach the geographic South Pole. Scott, accompanied by Dr Edward Wilson, Captain Lawrence Oates, Lieutenant Henry Bowers and Petty Officer Edgar Evans, reached the Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that the Norwegian expedition under Amundsen had beaten them to their objective by a month. Delayed by blizzards, and running out of supplies, Scott and the remainder of his team died at the end of March. Their bodies and diaries were found eight months later. From Scott's Last Expedition, Volume II. [Smith, Elder & Co., London, 1913]

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images