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Geological Gallery

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Geological Maps

Choose from 4,357 pictures in our Geological collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Earthquake distribution map Featured Geological Print

Earthquake distribution map

Earth's tectonic plates, artwork. The Earth's surface is divided up into several major plates. These are rocky slabs that float and move on the more fluid layer beneath them. Current direction of movement is indicated by red arrows. The boundaries between plates are geologically active areas, and are the sites of the majority of the world's volcanoes and earthquakes. Plate tectonics, the study of the plates, has revealed a huge amount about the Earth. For instance, South America's east coast appears to fit into Africa's west coast because they were once joined, but the plates that hold them are moving apart. Also, where the Indian plate collided with the Eurasian plate, the Himalayas were formed

© GARY HINCKS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Geological map of the British Isles Featured Geological Print

Geological map of the British Isles

Geological map of the British Isles, with a colour-coded key (right, see C015/2656 for details and names). The geology of the British Isles is extremely varied with rocks from nearly all geological periods. The rock formation types shown are: sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous. The majority of the rocks in Ireland, England and Wales are sedimentary, with large areas of volcanic and metamorphic rocks in Scotland. The sedimentary rocks are colour-coded by geological period from most recent to most ancient (top to bottom). The oldest rocks are in north-west Scotland, the youngest in south-east England. For a simpler map with less detail, see C015/2655

© GARY HINCKS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Krakatoa sunsets, 1883 artworks Featured Geological Print

Krakatoa sunsets, 1883 artworks

Krakatoa sunsets. Artwork of the spectacular red and orange sunsets caused in London, England, by the August 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, a volcano thousands of kilometres away in Indonesia. The ash thrown up by the eruption caused sunsets like these for years afterwards. These three artworks are a sequence, showing twilight and afterglow effects at Chelsea, London, on 26 November 1883, at around: 4.40pm (top); 5pm (middle); and 6.15pm (bottom). These are among the thousands of sunset sketches made by the British artist William Ashcroft. Krakatoa's eruption prompted many reports and investigations. These artworks formed the frontispiece for The Report of the Krakatoa Committee of the Royal Society (1888)

© ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY