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Choose from 4,305 pictures in our Geological collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Krakatoa sunsets, 1883 artworks Featured Geological Print

Krakatoa sunsets, 1883 artworks

Krakatoa sunsets. Artwork of the spectacular red and orange sunsets caused in London, England, by the August 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, a volcano thousands of kilometres away in Indonesia. The ash thrown up by the eruption caused sunsets like these for years afterwards. These three artworks are a sequence, showing twilight and afterglow effects at Chelsea, London, on 26 November 1883, at around: 4.40pm (top); 5pm (middle); and 6.15pm (bottom). These are among the thousands of sunset sketches made by the British artist William Ashcroft. Krakatoa's eruption prompted many reports and investigations. These artworks formed the frontispiece for The Report of the Krakatoa Committee of the Royal Society (1888)

© ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Soil triangle diagram Featured Geological Print

Soil triangle diagram

Soil triangle diagram. This diagram is used to work out the type of soil in an area. A sample of soil is left to settle in water. Larger particles settle out of suspension faster than smaller ones. Soil particles are placed in three categories depending on their size: sand (largest), silt and clay (smallest). Once the layers have settled, the depth of the layer is used to work out its percentage as a component of the soil. The three percentages are then read off the axes of the triangle: clay horizontally, silt towards bottom left and sand towards top left. Loams are the best soils for cultivation

© SHEILA TERRY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Oil well, 19th century Featured Geological Print

Oil well, 19th century

Oil well. Crude oil erupting from a wellhead in a 19th-century oil field. The wellhead is the structure used to contain and pump oil as it reaches the surface from deep underground, often, as here, under great pressure. This oil well is in the Balakhani oilfield in Baku, Azerbaijan, then under Russian rule. Oil had been produced in this region since at least the 16th century. The first modern oil wells here were drilled in the 1840s. The oil industry here expanded over the following decades, with large amounts of oil still being obtained here today. Artwork from the first volume (first period of 1888) of the French popular science weekly La Science Illustree

© SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY