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00007 Gallery

Choose from 342 pictures in our 00007 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping. We are proud to offer this selection in partnership with Memory Lane Prints.


Religion Jew August 1948 In accordance with Jewish religious practice these two Featured 00007 Print

Religion Jew August 1948 In accordance with Jewish religious practice these two

Religion Jew August 1948
In accordance with Jewish religious practice these two pupils at Whitechapel's Talmud Toreh School keep their caps on. They are preparing for their Bar-mitzvah (Equivalent to confirmation) and will afterwards wear long trousers as they will then be considered "MEN". Teacher Mr Isaacs gives them lesson in both Hebrew and Yiddish

© Mirrorpix

Pip Squeak & Wilfred December 1921 Daily Mirror Cartoon Characters Featured 00007 Print

Pip Squeak & Wilfred December 1921 Daily Mirror Cartoon Characters

Pip Squeak & Wilfred December 1921
Daily Mirror Cartoon Characters.
Father Xmas call on Pip, Squeak and Wilfred. A short sketch by Uncle Dich produced at the King's hall, Herne bay by the children of Miss Hyams dancing acadamy. Angeline tucks up the pets for the night

© Mirrorpix

1920s, 1921, 20th Century, Cartoon, Characters

Rebel prisoners being marched out of Dublin by British Soldiers May 1916 The Featured 00007 Print

Rebel prisoners being marched out of Dublin by British Soldiers May 1916 The

Rebel prisoners being marched out of Dublin by British Soldiers May 1916
The Easter Rebellion, was an armed uprising of Irish nationalists against the rule of Great Britain in Ireland. The uprising occurred on Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, and centred mainly in Dublin. The chief objectives were the attainment of political freedom and the establishment of an Irish republic. Centuries of discontent, marked by numerous rebellions, preceded the uprising. The new crisis began to develop in September 1914, following the outbreak of World War I, when the British government suspended the recently enacted Home Rule Bill, which guaranteed a measure of political autonomy to Ireland. Suspension of the bill stimulated the growth of the Citizen Army, an illegal force of Dublin citizens organised by the labour leader Jim Larkin (died 1948) and the socialist James Connolly (1870-1916); of the Irish Volunteers, a national defence body; and of the extremist Sinn F?in. The uprising was planned by leaders of these organisations, among whom were the British consular agent Sir Roger David Casement, the educator Padhraic Pearse (1879-1916), and the poet Thomas MacDonagh (1878-1916).
Hostilities began about noon on April 24, when about 2000 men led by Pearse seized control of the Dublin post office and other strategic points within the city. Shortly after these initial successes, the leaders of the rebellion proclaimed the Independence of Ireland and announced the establishment of a provisional government of the Irish Republic. Additional positions were occupied by the rebels during the night, and by the morning of April 25 they controlled a considerable part of Dublin. The counteroffensive by British forces began on Tuesday with the arrival of reinforcements. Martial law was proclaimed throughout Ireland. Bitter street fighting developed in Dublin, during which the strengthened British forces steadily dislodged the Irish from their positions. By the morning of April 29, the post office building, site of the rebel headquarters, was under violent attack. Recognising the futility of further resistance, Pearse surrendered unconditionally in the afternoon of April 29.
War Conflict Irish Rebellion Easter Uprising
Rebels
British Soldiers Rifle Bayonet
April 1916
1910s
©Mirrorpix

© Mirrorpix