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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Galapagos Islands Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 603 pictures in our Galapagos Islands collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Aerial view - Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz Island Featured Print

Aerial view - Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz Island

AU-1500
Galapagos Islands
Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz Island
Auscape
Please note that prints are for personal display purposes only and may not be reproduced in anyway

© D.Parer & E.Parer-Cook/ardea.com

Aerial, Aerials, America, American, Boat, Boats, Cities, City, Coastal, Countries, Country, Earth And Environment, Ecuador, Galapagos Islands, Geography, Habitat, Habitats, Island, Islands, Landscape, Landscapes, National Parks, Nture Reserve, Pacific Ocean, Sea, South America, South American, Town, Towns, Water

Blue-footed Booby - endemic Galapagos subspecies. Blue feet Featured Print

Blue-footed Booby - endemic Galapagos subspecies. Blue feet

ROG-12870
Blue-footed Booby - endemic Galapagos subspecies. Blue feet.
Galapagos, Ecuador
Sula nebouxii excisa
Bob Gibbons
Please note that prints are for personal display purposes only and may not be reproduced in any way

© Bob Gibbons/ardea.com

America, American, Bird, Blue, Blue Footed, Boobie, Boobies, Booby, Boobys, Colour, Colours, Ecuador, Endemic, Feet, Galapagos Islands, Island, National Parks, Nature Reserve, Pacific Ocean, Sea Birds, Single, South America, South American, Webbed Feet, Wild Life

Galapagos finches, artwork Featured Print

Galapagos finches, artwork

Galapagos finches. Artwork showing the beaks of different species of finches found in the Galapagos Islands. These birds were so different that naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) first thought that they were unrelated to each other. However, he later realised that they were all finches, in what is now known as the family Fringillidae. He went on to draw the conclusion that they all probably came from a common ancestor, but had diversified and evolved to adapt to local food supplies on the different islands, hence the specialised beak shapes seen here. See C003/5865 for a labelled version of this image

© GARY HINCKS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY