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Bamiyan Collection

Bamiyan, a place that holds the remnants of a tragic history and the beauty of ancient art

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Buddha statue in cliffs (since destroyed by the Taliban), Bamiyan, Afghanistan

Buddha statue in cliffs (since destroyed by the Taliban), Bamiyan, Afghanistan

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Afghanistan, Bamiyan Valley and Giant Buddha

Afghanistan, Bamiyan Valley and Giant Buddha

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Afghan nomad family in front of one of two Buddhas of Bamiyan, 1950, Painting

Afghan nomad family in front of one of two Buddhas of Bamiyan, 1950, Painting
Afghanistan, 20th century. Afghan nomad family in front of one of the two Buddhas of Bamiyan, 1950. Painting. Both statues were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Giant standing Buddha, 5th-6th century (stone)

Giant standing Buddha, 5th-6th century (stone)
EAM156814 Giant standing Buddha, 5th-6th century (stone) by Afghan School; Valley of the Buddhas, Bamyan, Afghanistan; (add.info.: destroyed 2001 by the Taliban regime; ); Afghan, out of copyright

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Sun god Surya on his chariot. Copy of a painted mural inside the niche of a Bamiyan Buddha... 1935

Sun god Surya on his chariot. Copy of a painted mural inside the niche of a Bamiyan Buddha... 1935
Sun god Surya on his chariot. Copy of a painted mural inside the niche of a Bamiyan Buddha from the 7th century. Destroyed by th, 1935. Found in the collection of the Musee Guimet, Paris

Background imageBamiyan Collection: helianthus annuus, sunflower, yellow subject

helianthus annuus, sunflower, yellow subject
Helianthus annuus Sunflower Yellow subject

Background imageBamiyan Collection: The Buddhas of Bamiyan, Afghanistan

The Buddhas of Bamiyan, Afghanistan Date: 1834

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Giant Standing Buddha, 5th-6th century (stone)

Giant Standing Buddha, 5th-6th century (stone)
ALI259694 Giant Standing Buddha, 5th-6th century (stone) by Afghan School; Valley of the Buddhas, Bamyan, Afghanistan; (add.info)

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Les Statues Colossales Du Bamian (engraving)

Les Statues Colossales Du Bamian (engraving)
2788941 Les Statues Colossales Du Bamian (engraving) by French School, (19th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Les Statues Colossales Du Bamian)

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Les Statues Colossales Du Bamian (engraving)

Les Statues Colossales Du Bamian (engraving)
2788940 Les Statues Colossales Du Bamian (engraving) by French School, (19th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Les Statues Colossales Du Bamian)

Background imageBamiyan Collection: ©EyeUbiquitous_20047937

©EyeUbiquitous_20047937
AFGHANISTAN, Bamiyan Rock formations at Red Dragon

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Buddha of Bamiyan

Buddha of Bamiyan
Sasaal (light permeating the universe) was the male Buddha of Bamiyan. It was built in 554 AD and stood 53-58 meters tall.Along with other Buddhist relics in the Bamiyan valley

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Buddha of Bamiyan | Afghanistan

Buddha of Bamiyan | Afghanistan
Salsaal was the larger of the two buddha status of Bamiyan.The Buddhas of Bamiyan were two 6th century monumental statues of standing buddha carved into the side of a cliff in the Bamiyan valley in

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Shamama Buddha of Bamiyan

Shamama Buddha of Bamiyan
Shamama (Queen Mother) once stood as the second tallest Buddha statue in the Bamiyan valley with a height of 38 meters. It represented a female deity was built around the 6th century AD

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Fragment of the Fresco with Buddhas in the cupola of a grotto. From Kakrak (Bamiyan), 7th-8th centur

Fragment of the Fresco with Buddhas in the cupola of a grotto. From Kakrak (Bamiyan), 7th-8th century. Found in the collection of Musee Guimet, Paris

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Smaller Buddha of Bamiyan

Smaller Buddha of Bamiyan
Ruins of smaller Buddha of Bamiyan - Shamama

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Valley of the Buddhas | Bamiyan

Valley of the Buddhas | Bamiyan
The Buddha statues of Bamiyan were built in the 5th and 6th century A.D. They were blown up by the Taliban regime in 2001

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Buddha of Bamiyan

Buddha of Bamiyan
Shamama (Queen mother) was the female Buddha statue of Bamiyan. It was built in 507 AD and stood 35-38 meters tall. Along with other Buddhist relics in the Bamiyan valley

Background imageBamiyan Collection: The Buddha of Bamiyan

The Buddha of Bamiyan
Sasaal (light permeating the universe) was the male Buddha of Bamiyan. It was built in 554 AD and stood 53-58 meters tall.Along with other Buddhist relics in the Bamiyan valley

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Afghanistan, Bamian Valley. A young girl waits in a field below pink cliffs in the Bamian Valley

Afghanistan, Bamian Valley. A young girl waits in a field below pink cliffs in the Bamian Valley, a World Heritage Site, in Afghanistan

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Afghanistan, Bamian Valley. Rolling hills lead to the snow fields of the rugged Hindu

Afghanistan, Bamian Valley. Rolling hills lead to the snow fields of the rugged Hindu Kush Mountains near Bamian Valley, Afghanistan

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Afghanistan, Bamian Valley. A Kuchi nomad camp in Bamian Valley, a World Heritage Site

Afghanistan, Bamian Valley. A Kuchi nomad camp in Bamian Valley, a World Heritage Site, in Afghanistan, survives in the shadow of the Hindu Kush

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Asia, Afghanistan

Asia, Afghanistan
Afghanistan, Bamian Valley. A lonely caravansary sits at the base of foothills of the Hindu Kush in Bamian Valley, a World Heritage Site, Afghanistan

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Cave painting at large Buddha cave before destruction by the Taliban, Bamiyan

Cave painting at large Buddha cave before destruction by the Taliban, Bamiyan, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Large Buddha, subsequently destroyed by the Taliban, Bamiyan, UNESCO World Heritage Site

Large Buddha, subsequently destroyed by the Taliban, Bamiyan, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Pai Mori Gorge, between Kabul and Bamiyan (the southern route), Bamiyan province

Pai Mori Gorge, between Kabul and Bamiyan (the southern route), Bamiyan province, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Tourist and locals at the Magenta cliffs near Shahr-e-Zohak (Red City)

Tourist and locals at the Magenta cliffs near Shahr-e-Zohak (Red City), between Kabul and Bamiyan (the southern route), Bamiyan province, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Small Buddha statue in cliff (since destroyed by the Taliban), Bamiyan, Afghanistan

Small Buddha statue in cliff (since destroyed by the Taliban), Bamiyan, Afghanistan

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Ruins of the Shah-I-Gholghola, the Silent City, at Bamiyan, Hindu Kush, Afghanistan, Asia

Ruins of the Shah-I-Gholghola, the Silent City, at Bamiyan, Hindu Kush, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Watchtower at ruins which were once the site of a tall standing Buddha in a niche

Watchtower at ruins which were once the site of a tall standing Buddha in a niche, Kakrak valley, Bamiyan, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Boy threshing with oxen, Bamiyan Province, Afghanistan, Asia

Boy threshing with oxen, Bamiyan Province, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Cliffs with empty niches where the famous carved Buddhas once stood

Cliffs with empty niches where the famous carved Buddhas once stood, destroyed by the Taliban in 2001, Bamiyan, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Bamiyan province, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Boys threshing with oxen, Bamiyan, Bamiyan Province, Afghanistan, Asia

Boys threshing with oxen, Bamiyan, Bamiyan Province, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Empty niche in the cliff where one of the famous carved Buddhas once stood

Empty niche in the cliff where one of the famous carved Buddhas once stood, destroyed by the Taliban in 2001, Bamiyan, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Bamiyan province, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Empty niche where one of the famous carved Buddhas once stood, destroyed by the Taliban

Empty niche where one of the famous carved Buddhas once stood, destroyed by the Taliban, Bamiyan, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: View of Bamiyan showing cliffs with two empty niches where the famous carved Buddhas stood

View of Bamiyan showing cliffs with two empty niches where the famous carved Buddhas stood, since destroyed by the Taliban, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Ruined citadel of Shahr-e-Gholgola (City of the Screaming) (City of Noise)

Ruined citadel of Shahr-e-Gholgola (City of the Screaming) (City of Noise), destroyed by Genghis Khan in 1221 AD, Bamiyan, Afghanistan, Asia

Background imageBamiyan Collection: The Bamiyan Valley and the Koh-i-Baba Range of mountains, Afghanistan

The Bamiyan Valley and the Koh-i-Baba Range of mountains, Afghanistan

Background imageBamiyan Collection: Main street of Bamiyan, Afghanistan, Asia

Main street of Bamiyan, Afghanistan, Asia


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Bamiyan, a place that holds the remnants of a tragic history and the beauty of ancient art. Nestled in the Bamiyan Valley of Afghanistan, this region was once home to two magnificent Buddha statues carved into cliffs. Standing tall and proud, these giant stone Buddhas dated back to the 5th-6th century. Sadly, their grandeur was short-lived as they were destroyed by the Taliban in an act of cultural vandalism. Today, all that remains are haunting memories and photographs capturing their former glory. One such image depicts an Afghan nomad family standing proudly in front of one of the Buddhas during a simpler time in 1950. The painting serves as a poignant reminder of what once stood there - symbols of peace and enlightenment towering over the valley. Another engraving titled "Les Statues Colossales Du Bamian" showcases these colossal figures with intricate details etched onto stone, and is through these engravings that we can still appreciate their magnificence even after their physical destruction. In contrast to this historical tragedy, another photograph captures fields filled with vibrant yellow sunflowers known as helianthus annuus. These flowers bring life and color to Bamiyan's landscape today, symbolizing hope amidst adversity. The legacy left behind by the Giant Standing Buddha continues to resonate throughout history books and conversations about cultural preservation. Fragments from frescoes found within grottos also provide glimpses into Bamiyan's rich artistic past dating back to the 7th-8th century. While it may be heartbreaking to witness what has been lost at Bamiyan, it is crucial not only to remember its past but also strive for a future where such acts against heritage never occur again. The Buddha statues may no longer grace those cliffs, but their memory lives on as a testament to human resilience and our collective responsibility towards preserving our shared cultural treasures.