Skip to main content
sales@mediastorehouse.com
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
Home > Animals > Aquatic

Aquatic Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 10,512 pictures in our Aquatic collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Humour rain umbrella St. Swithin 19th century cartoon Featured Aquatic Print

Humour rain umbrella St. Swithin 19th century cartoon

This is a cartoon etching by the well-known Victorian social caricaturist / cartoonist George Cruikshank (1792 - 1878), dated November 1st, 1829. (1829 is in the reign of William IV, but most of Cruikshank's artistic work was in the long reign of Queen Victoria.) Cruikshank went on to illustrate a number of the books of Charles Dickens. Title: St. Swithin, Patron Saint of Umbrella makers. Singing: Long to Rain over us'. Description: If it rains on St. Swithin's Day (July 15 ), or so the saying goes, then it will rain for forty days and forty nights. Cruikshank sees this as a benefit for business, for the manufacturers of umbrellas. St. Swithin (St. Swithun) is shown showering two watering cans on his victims, while riding a flying dolphin that spouts a deluge from its mouth and nostrils. Under a large umbrella, the people of Britain dance and sing Long to rain over us, combining a homage to the rain and the reign of the king (William IV). The rendering of the dolphin is usual for this time since they were looked upon as fish. Designed Etched & Published by Geo. Cruikshank a?? Novr. 1st 1829

© Whiteway

Tardigrade, SEM Featured Aquatic Print

Tardigrade, SEM

Water bear. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a water bear, or tardigrade (phylum Tardigrada). Water bears are small, water-dwelling, segmented micro-animals with eight legs that live in damp habitats such as moss or lichen. They are classed as extremophiles as they can survive dry conditions by changing into a desiccated state, in which they can remain for many years. Whilst in this form (known as a tun) they can withstand the most extreme environments and can tolerate radiation levels as high as x1000 more than other animals, including humans. They have even been brought back alive after spending 10 days in the vacuum of space. Magnification: x1000, when printed at 10 centimetres wide

© Science Photo Library

Darwinism, Natural Selection of Living Organisms, lithograph, published in 1897 Featured Aquatic Print

Darwinism, Natural Selection of Living Organisms, lithograph, published in 1897

Darwinism - Principle of Natural Selection of Living Organisms by Charles Darwin (English naturalist, 1809-1882): 1 - 4) in animals of the same breed and environment - Bumblebee (Bombus confusus); 5 - 7) Climatic transformations between southern and northern Europe - Small tortoiseshell (Aglais urticae); 8 - 9) Transformations between the seasons (seasonal dimorphism) - Map butterfly (Araschnia levana); 10 - 16) Gender-specific transformations (Sexual dimorphism) - Ancyluris inca (female 10, male 11), Scarab beetle (Phanaeus festivus, 12 male, 13-16 male); 17 - 19) Crossbreed between of two organisms of different breeds, varieties, species or genera through sexual reproduction (Bastardization) - Primula auricula (17) and Primula hirsuta (18) are the parents of Primula pubescens (19); 20 - 25) Adaptation to the aquatic life - Water chestnut (Trapa natans), plant (20) and nut (21), Water-crowfoot (Ranunculus aquatilis, 22), Mayfly (Ephemera vulgata, 23) and its gill larva (24), Backswimmer (Notonecta glauca, 25); 26 - 27) Adapting to the parasite life - Toothwort (Lathraea squamaria, 26), Dutchman's pipe (Monotropa Hypopithys, 27). Lithograph, published in 1897