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Ships and Boats Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 3345 pictures in our Ships and Boats collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Ships and Boats Print

Maria Asumpta, Fowey, Cornwall. August 1993

The Maria Asumpta, the world's oldest wooden sailing boat still working, leaves Fowey at the head of a flotilla of classic boats. The classic boats was held for the third year running at the port, organised by the Fowey Royal Regatta committee. Maria Asumpta was launched at Badalona, Spain, in 1858 and was used to ship textiles between Argentina and Spain. Renamed Pepita in the 1930s, Cuidad de Inca in 1953, she was given back her original name in 1988. Photographer: Jonathan Barker

© RIC, photographer Jonathan Barker

Featured Ships and Boats Print

Green Waters, Henry Scott Tuke (1858-1929)

Oil on canvas, Newlyn School, late 19th / early 20th century. A man sculling in a small boat. Henry Scott Tuke was born into a Quaker family in Lawrence Street, York. In 1859 the family moved to Falmouth, where his father Daniel Tuke, a physician, established a practice. Tuke was encouraged to draw and paint from an early age and some of his earliest drawings, aged four or five years old, were published in 1895. In 1875, he enrolled in the Slade School of Art. Initially his father paid for his tuition but in 1877 Tuke won a scholarship, which allowed him to continue his training at the Slade and in Italy in 1880. From 1881 to 1883 he was in Paris where he met the artist Jules Bastien-Lepage, who encouraged him to paint en plein air (in the open air) a method of working that came to dominate his practice. While studying in France, Tuke decided to move to Newlyn, Cornwall where many of his Slade and Parisian friends had already formed the Newlyn School of painters. He received several lucrative commissions there, after exhibiting his work at the Royal Academy of Art in London. In 1885, he returned to Falmouth where many of his major works were produced. He became an established artist and was elected to full membership of the Royal Academy in 1914. Tuke suffered a heart attack in 1928 and died in March 1929. In his will he left generous amounts of money to some of the men who, as boys, had been his models. Today he is remembered mainly for his oil paintings of young men, but in addition to his achievements as a figurative painter, he was an established maritime artist and produced as many portraits of sailing ships as he did human figures. He was a prolific artist, over 1,300 works are listed and more are still being discovered

© RIC

Featured Ships and Boats Print

Models of SS and RMS Britannic BL22639_002

Models of the SS Britannic and the RMS Britannic, photographed by Bedford Lemere and Company in May 1914. The smaller SS Britannic was launched by White Star Line in 1874 and scrapped in 1903. Her primary role was the carriage of immigrant passengers across the Atlantic between Liverpool and New York. The second White Star ship to bear the name Britannic was an Olympic-class ocean liner launched in February 1914 as a sister ship of RMS Titanic. Like her namesake, she too was built by Harland and Wolff as a transatlantic passenger liner, but following the outbreak of the First World War she was requisitioned as a hospital ship and became HMHS Britannic (His Majesty's Hospital Ship) and was sunk in 1916 after striking a mine

© Historic England Archive