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Space Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 156 pictures in our Space collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Hubble Reopens Eye on the Universe Featured Space Print

Hubble Reopens Eye on the Universe

In its first glimpse of the heavens following the successful December 1999 servicing mission, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured a majestic view of a planetary nebula, the glowing remains of a dying, Sun-like star. This stellar relic, first spied by William Herschel in 1787, is nicknamed the "Eskimo" Nebula (NGC 2392) because, when viewed through ground-based telescopes, it resembles a face surrounded by a fur parka. In this Hubble telescope image, the "parka" is really a disk of material embellished with a ring of comet-shaped objects, with their tails streaming away from the central, dying star. The Eskimo's "face" also contains some fascinating details. Although this bright central region resembles a ball of twine, it is, in reality, a bubble of material being blown into space by the central star's intense "wind" of high-speed material. In this photo, one bubble lies in front of the other, obscuring part of the second lobe. Scientists believe that a ring of dense material around the star's equator, ejected during its red giant phase, created the nebula's shape. The bubbles are not smooth like balloons but have filaments of denser matter. Each bubble is about 1 light-year long and about half a light-year wide. Scientists are still puzzled about the origin of the comet-shaped features in the "parka." One possible explanation is that these objects formed from a collision of slow-and fast-moving gases. The Eskimo Nebula is about 5, 000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Gemini. The picture was taken Jan. 10 and 11, 2000, with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The nebula's glowing gases produce the colors in this image: nitrogen (red), hydrogen (green), oxygen (blue), and helium (violet)

© NASA

Astronaut Duke next to Plum Crater, Apollo 16 Featured Space Print

Astronaut Duke next to Plum Crater, Apollo 16

Exploring the Moon: astronaut Duke stands next to Crater Plum during the first excursion of the Apollo 16 mission. Duke is seen holding a bore sampling implement, used to take vertical profile samples of the lunar soil. On the far side of the 30 metre wide crater is the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). Astronauts Duke and Young landed in the Descartes region of the Moon on 21 April 1972. During their 71 hour visit, they made three excursions on the surface totalling 20 hours 14 minutes, covering 26 kilometres in the LRV. After blasting off from the Moon, they rejoined astronaut Mattingly in the Command and Service Module, returning to Earth on 27 April 1972

© NASA/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Hubble Telescope in the shuttle's cargo bay Featured Space Print

Hubble Telescope in the shuttle's cargo bay

Hubble Telescope servicing. Astronaut performsan ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA or "spacewalk")during a space shuttle mission to service theHubble Space Telescope (HST). The astronaut isworking near the foot restraint of the robotic arm(the Remote Manipulator System or RMS) that wasused to capture the HST from orbit. Photograph ofSteven Smith in the cargo bay of the Discovery shuttle during mission STS-82 (11-21 February1997). This mission was the second to service theHST since its launch in 1990. During theservicing, improved instruments were added andsome aging components were replaced. The shuttlealso lifted the HST into a slightly higher orbit

© Nasa/Science Photo Library