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Telescopes Radio Gallery

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Choose from 123 pictures in our Telescopes Radio collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Upgraded Arecibo radio telescope with subreflector Featured Telescopes Radio Print

Upgraded Arecibo radio telescope with subreflector

Upgraded Arecibo radio observatory. Aerial fisheye lens view of the Arecibo radio telescope, with its gregorian subreflector system newly installed in 1997. This largest radio telescope in the world is situated in a natural crater in the mountains of Puerto Rico. The new subreflector system with two mirrors is housed in a 90-tonne dome receiver seen suspended 130 metres above the fixed dish. It can send and receive signals to examine planets and asteroids & also analyse Earth's upper atmosphere. To scan the sky the dome is steered above the 305m dish. The upgrade includes a 16m high buffer screen around the dish and a new radar transmitter that increases Arecibo's power by 20 times

© David Parker/Science Photo Library

A Grazing Encounter Between Two Spiral Galaxies Featured Telescopes Radio Print

A Grazing Encounter Between Two Spiral Galaxies

The larger and more massive galaxy is cataloged as NGC 2207 (on the left in the Hubble Heritage image), and the smaller one on the right is IC 2163. Strong tidal forces from NGC 2207 have distorted the shape of IC 2163, flinging out stars and gas into long streamers stretching out a hundred thousand light-years toward the right-hand edge of the image. Computer simulations, carried out by a team led by Bruce and Debra Elmegreen, demonstrate the leisurely timescale over which galactic collisions occur. In addition to the Hubble images, measurements made with the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array Radio Telescope in New Mexico reveal the motions of the galaxies and aid the reconstruction of the collision. The calculations indicate that IC 2163 is swinging past NGC 2207 in a counterclockwise direction, having made its closest approach 40 million years ago. However, IC 2163 does not have sufficient energy to escape from the gravitational pull of NGC 2207, and is destined to be pulled back and swing past the larger galaxy again in the future. The high resolution of the Hubble telescope image reveals dust lanes in the spiral arms of NGC 2207, clearly silhouetted against IC 2163, which is in the background. Hubble also reveals a series of parallel dust filaments extending like fine brush strokes along the tidally stretched material on the right-hand side. The large concentrations of gas and dust in both galaxies may well erupt into regions of active star formation in the near future. Trapped in their mutual orbit around each other, these two galaxies will continue to distort and disrupt each other. Eventually, billions of years from now, they will merge into a single, more massive galaxy. It is believed that many present-day galaxies, including the Milky Way, were assembled from a similar process of coalescence of smaller galaxies occurring over billions of years. This image was created from 3 separate pointings of Hubble. The Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 data sets were obtained by Debra Meloy Elmegreen (Vassar College), Bruce G. Elmegreen (IBM Research Division), Michele Kaufman (Ohio State U.), Elias Brinks (Universidad de Guanajuato, Mexico), Curt Struck (Iowa State University), Magnus Thomasson (Onsala Space Obs., Sweden), Maria Sundin (Goteborg University, Sweden), and Mario Klaric (Columbia, South Carolina)

© NASA

Centaurus A galaxy, HST image Featured Telescopes Radio Print

Centaurus A galaxy, HST image

Centaurus A galaxy. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of the active galaxy Centaurus A, which is thought to house a massive black hole. Centaurus A is a large elliptical galaxy which collided with a smaller spiral galaxy millions of years ago, sparking a huge burst of starbirth activity. Large areas of young blue stars are seen on either side of the dark lane of dust. This dust is thought to be the remnant of the smaller galaxy which Centaurus A swallowed. Centaurus A is also a powerful emitter of radio waves powered by its black hole. It lies 10 million light years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. Image taken in July 2010 with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the HST

© NASA/ESA/STScI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY