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Earth Gallery

Choose from 1,131 pictures in our Earth collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Alexei Leonov, first space walk, 1965 Featured Earth Image

Alexei Leonov, first space walk, 1965

First space walk. Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov (born 1934), outside the Voskhod 2 spacecraft in a spacesuit on 18 March 1965, while orbiting the Earth (in the background). This was the world's first extravehicular activity (EVA), or space walk. Voskhod 2 had launched earlier that day, and Leonov exited the spacecraft at 08:30 UTC. He remained outside for 10 minutes, before trying to re-enter. Because his suit had ballooned while outside, he had to let some of his air out before he could successfully re-enter. Cameras mounted on the airlock were meant to record the space walk, but most had to be abandoned due to the problems with Leonov's spacesuit. The CCCP on Leonov's helmet refers to the USSR

© RIA NOVOSTI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Pioneer F Plaque Symbology Featured Earth Image

Pioneer F Plaque Symbology

The Pioneer F spacecraft, destined to be the first man made object to escape from the solar system into interstellar space, carries this pictorial plaque. It is designed to show scientifically educated inhabitants of some other star system, who might intercept it millions of years from now, when Pioneer was launched, from where, and by what kind of beings. (With the hope that they would not invade Earth.) The design is etched into a 6 inch by 9 inch gold-anodized aluminum plate, attached to the spacecraft's attenna support struts in a position to help shield it from erosion by interstellar dust. The radiating lines at left represents the positions of 14 pulsars, a cosmic source of radio energy, arranged to indicate our sun as the home star of our civilization. The "1-" symbols at the ends of the lines are binary numbers that represent the frequencies of these pulsars at the time of launch of Pioneer F relative of that to the hydrogen atom shown at the upper left with a "1" unity symbol. The hydrogen atom is thus used as a "universal clock, " and the regular decrease in the frequencies of the pulsars will enable another civilization to determine the time that has elapsed since Pioneer F was launched. The hydrogen is also used as a "universal yardstick" for sizing the human figures and outline of the spacecraft shown on the right. The hydrogen wavelength, about 8 inches, multiplied by the binary number representing "8" shown next to the woman gives her height, 64 inches. The figures represent the type of creature that created Pioneer. The man's hand is raised in a gesture of good will. Across the bottom are the planets, ranging outward from the Sun, with the spacecraft trajectory arching away from Earth, passing Mars, and swinging by Jupiter

© NASA

North America at night, satellite image Featured Earth Image

North America at night, satellite image

Africa at night. Satellite image of the Earth at night, set against a background of stars, centred on the continent of Africa. North is at top. City lights (yellow) show areas of dense population. Most of Africa is dark in comparison with the bright lights of the cities of Europe and the Middle East (across top). Rural and undeveloped areas in Africa include the vast Sahara desert in the north, tropical forests in central Africa, and the savannah and deserts of eastern and southern Africa. City lights seen outside Africa and Europe include part of South America (lower left), India (upper right) and islands in the Atlantic and Indian oceans. Image data obtained in 2001 by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)

© NASA/NOAA/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY