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Railways Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 56 pictures in our Railways collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery. We are proud to offer this selection in partnership with Royal Cornwall Museum.


View of Gwinear Road station looking west, Cornwall. Possibly at the opening of the Helston branch line on 9th May 1887 Featured Railways Print

View of Gwinear Road station looking west, Cornwall. Possibly at the opening of the Helston branch line on 9th May 1887

'This photograph was probably taken on 9th May 1887, the opening day of the Helston branch line. Every part of the railway infrastructure in view is in almost perfect condition, having been newly installed for the creation of the new junction station. The stone work to the platforms and the locking room has obviously only recently been laid. Even the staff are well turned out. The main line retains the mixed gauge, albeit relaid with cross-sleepered track, whilst the branch line bay has been laid in narrow gauge only. The bay continues beyond the station, to a buffer stop built against the newly cut back end of the original cutting side. The branch line engine is in attendance, almost certainly a 517 class 0-4-2T, complete with polished brass dome. The contrasting painting schemes of the Signal & Telegraph department, responsible for the signal box next to the crossing, and that of the station buildings are clearly evident. In particular the signal box windows sashes are white, whereas those on the station are darker, probably brown. The signal box barge boards are relatively dark when compared with the wall boarding, whilst those on the station appear considerably lighter. The signals are the standard G.W.R. type which was to survive for many years, although at this period only single red spectacle plates were fitted, "all right" being indicated simply by the white light" Information from: The Broad Gauge In Cornwall. M. Jolly & P. Garnsworthy. Gwinear Road station with a locomotive on the Helston branch line with her crew and members of the station staff. Advertising on the station includes 'The Angel Hotel, Helston', 'W & A Gilbey' and 'Moon & Sons'

© From the collection of the RIC

GWR tank number 34 pictured with four men on the St Ives branch. Around 1905 Featured Railways Print

GWR tank number 34 pictured with four men on the St Ives branch. Around 1905

The image shows GWR number 34 pictured with two unnamed men, Charlie Gould the fireman standing on the running plate and the driver Nickie Curnow standing with his feeder (oil can) on the St Ives branch line. The engine itself has a 0-4-4 tank, built as a 0-4-2 saddle tank, along with number 35 at Swindon in 1890 as Lot Number 81. The locomotive was altered to the 0-4-4 side tank in 1895. It weighed 40 tons and had a 800 gallon water capacity. Number 34 was sold in 1908 and eventually made her way to the Longmoor Military Railway where she carried the name 'Longmoor'. She was sadly cut up in 1922

© From the collection of the RIC

View of the Ponsanooth viaduct, Cornwall. Early 1900s Featured Railways Print

View of the Ponsanooth viaduct, Cornwall. Early 1900s

On the advice of the Victorian railway engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, river crossings for the new Cornish railway line built by the Cornwall Railway Company (1859 to 1889) took the form of wooden viaducts, 42 in total, consisting of timber deck spans supported by fans of timber bracing built on masonry piers. This unusual method of construction substantially reduced the first cost of construction compared to an all-masonry structure, but at the cost of more expensive maintenance. The Ponsanooth viaduct crossed the River Kennall 2 miles north of Penryn. A Class B viaduct 139 feet (42 m) high and 645 feet (197 m) long on 9 piers. It was replaced by a new stone viaduct on 7 September 1930. This is the tallest viaduct west of Truro. In the foreground can be seen Wheal Maudlin (Magdalen) works (former Perran foundry boiler works). Photographer: Unknown

© From the collection of the RIC