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Brunel Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Choose from 657 pictures in our Brunel collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Brunels tunnelling shield Featured Brunel Print

Brunels tunnelling shield

The tunnelling shield, or excavating machine designed by Sir Marc Isambard Brunel (1769- 1849) & used in the construction of the lining of the Thames tunnel. The shield (right) consists of twelve frames, which could be edged forward independently, supporting the side of the tunnel while allowing bricklayers to work from it. A moveable stage enabled building materials to be brought up to the level of the advancing face of the lining. The tunnel, running under the Thames between Rotherhithe & Wapping, was begun by Sir Marc Brunel in 1825 & completed in 1873 after his death. It was designed for foot passengers & later taken over by London Underground

© SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY.

The Royal Albert Bridge, Saltash, GWR poster, 1945 Featured Brunel Print

The Royal Albert Bridge, Saltash, GWR poster, 1945

Poster produced for Great Western Railway (GWR) to promote rail services to Devon & Cornwall. The Royal Albert Bridge was designed and built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1803- 1859). The bridge spans the river Tamar, which links Devon and Cornwall. The artwork is from an original watercolour by Anton Abraham van Anrooy (1870-1949), who was born and educated in Holland. He painted portraits and interiors, and designed posters for London & North Eastern Railway (LNER) as well as GWR

© NRM/Pictorial Collection

First Christmas Card by Sir Henry Cole and John Horsley Featured Brunel Print

First Christmas Card by Sir Henry Cole and John Horsley

Reputedly the first Christmas card, this was designed by Horsley in 1843, and a coloured version sent out by Sir Henry Cole in 1846.
Commissioned by Sir Henry Cole and illustrated by John Callcott Horsley in London on 1 May 1843. The central picture shows three generations of a family raising a toast to the card's recipient: on either side are charity scenes including food and clothing being given to the poor. Allegedly the image of the family drinking wine together proved controversial, but the idea was shrewd: Cole had helped introduce the Penny Post three years earlier. Two batches totaling 2, 050 cards were printed and sold that year for a shilling each, and of those just a dozen are known to have survived.
We are offering reproduction prints of the original design. In 2001 an original version sold for a record 22, 500 pounds sterling at auction in Devizes, Wiltshire, England. After attracting bids from collectors in Britain and America, it eventually sold for the record-breaking price.
The auctioned card was especially sought after because it was sent by Sir Henry to his grandmother and aunt, and signed by the great Victorian.
John Callcott Horsley was an English painter, illustrator, and designer. Born in London on 29 January 1817, he was the grand-nephew of the English landscape painter Sir Augustus Callcott. His sister, Mary Elizabeth Horsley, was the wife of the famous British engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel.
Horsley studied painting at the Royal Academy where he met the painter Thomas Webster. His paintings were largely of historical subjects set in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, influenced by the Dutch masters Pieter de Hooch and Vermeer. From 1875 to 1897, Horsley was a rector and treasurer of the Royal Academy. Because he was strictly against nude models he earned the nickname "Clothes-Horsley".
Cole is credited with devising the concept of sending greeting cards at Christmas time

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10021527