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Related Images Gallery

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Canada in North America

Choose from 13920 pictures in our Related Images collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


GRIZZLY BEAR - standing and roaring Featured Related Images Print

GRIZZLY BEAR - standing and roaring

WAT-4216
GRIZZLY BEAR - standing and roaring
USA
Ursus arctos horribilis
The Grizzly is a sub species of the North American Brown Bear
Distribution: Alaska, Canada and United States.
M. Watson
Please note that prints are for personal display purposes only and may not be reproduced in any way

Great Grey OWL - perched on conifer in snow storm Featured Related Images Print

Great Grey OWL - perched on conifer in snow storm

JZ-1504 Great Grey OWL - perched on conifer in snow storm Bracebridge, Ontario, Canada. Strix nebulosa Jim Zipp Please note that prints are for personal display purposes only and may not be reproduced in any way

© Ardea 2007 - All Rights Reserved

America, American, Bird, Birds Of Prey, Canada, Christmas, Expression, Grey, Grumpy, Ice, North America, North American, Owl, Perched, Season, Seasonal, Single, Snow, Sympathy, Weather, Weather Conditions, Wild Life, Winter

HMS 'Erebus' and HMS 'Terror', 1845 Featured Related Images Print

HMS 'Erebus' and HMS 'Terror', 1845

Engraving showing HMS 'Erebus' (left) and HMS 'Terror', pictured on the River Thames, 1845. In 1845 the British Admiralty sent two polar exploration ships, HMS 'Erebus' and HMS 'Terror', to look for the Northwest passage round the northern coast of Canada. The expedition, commanded by Sir John Franklin, disappeared from view late in 1845 and none of the men were ever seen again. In fact the ships made it to the King William Island region, then got stuck in the ice. With supplies running out the surviving crew abandoned ship and headed south. However, none made it to safety and it is assumed all died from disease, exposure or starvation. From 1848 onwards a number of relief expeditions were sent to find Franklin, but it was only in 1859 that Francis Leopold McClintock was able to confirm Franklin's fate

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10217704