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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
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Stupid Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 42 pictures in our Stupid collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Mayor of Middle Wallop not appreciating Shakespeare Featured Print

The Mayor of Middle Wallop not appreciating Shakespeare

The sublime ignorance of the Mayor of Middle Wallop. The Mayor of Middle Wallop (who is interested in the decoration of the new theatre in M.W.) - "Oo's that Gentleman you're painting?" Artist: - "That is William Shakespeare." The M. of M.W. - "As 'e ever done anything for Middle Wallop?" Artist: - "No Sir, not that I'm aware of." The M. of M.W. - "Then paint 'im out and paint ME in." !!! Date: 1904

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection

'Loopt Loopt Met Groot Verblyden,, Hier Salmen twyf van Lije Snyden', 17th century. Artist: HW Weydman Featured Print

'Loopt Loopt Met Groot Verblyden,, Hier Salmen twyf van Lije Snyden', 17th century. Artist: HW Weydman

'Loopt Loopt Met Groot Verblyden, Hier Salmen twyf van Lije Snyden', 17th century. This image shows a quack doctor about to make an incision in a woman's head to remove the stones that are supposedly embedded within it. This was a popular subject matter in late 16th and early 17th century prints in the Netherlands and mocked the gullibility and simple nature of village people. Stones in one's head was seen as the cause of stupidity and a number of other ailments. This is where the English idiom 'rocks in the head' comes from.

© The Print Collector

'London's Nightmare', 1866. Artist: John Tenniel Featured Print

'London's Nightmare', 1866. Artist: John Tenniel

'London's Nightmare', 1866. A man holding banner with the word Bumbledom on it, sits on the chest of a woman representing London. He has a particularly stupid expression on his face. Bumbledom was the term used to encapsulate 'the conflicting jurisdictions of folks who ought to have no jurisdiction at all, and who job, blunder, squabble, and utterly misgovern the metropolis of the world'. Bumbledom was thus seen as stifling the capital. From Punch, or the London Charivari, March 10, 1866.

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images