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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Story Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 758 pictures in our Story collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Flying Officer W E Johns - Biggles stories in Modern Boy Featured Print

Flying Officer W E Johns - Biggles stories in Modern Boy

Advertisement in The Modern Boy magazine for the forthcoming series of stories written by Flying Officer W. E. Johns concerning the wartime adventures of Captain James Bigglesworth, known to his comrades as Biggles. William Earl Johns (5 February 1893 21 June 1968) was an English pilot and writer of adventure stories, usually written under the pen name Captain W. E. Johns. He is best remembered as the creator of the ace pilot and adventurer Biggles. Date: 1932

© Mary Evans Picture Library

Cervantess Don Quixote in his library Featured Print

Cervantess Don Quixote in his library

Cervantes's Don Quixote in his library, 1863 French edition. Don Quixote reading books on chivalry in his library before setting out on his quest. Don Quixote is a work published in two parts (1605 and 1615) by Spanish novelist Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616). It tells the story of a Spanish nobleman and would-be knight Alonso Quijano (who calls himself Don Quixote) and the farmer Sancho who travels with him as his squire. Artwork, by French artist Gustave Dore (1832-1883; engraved by Heliodore Joseph Pisan (1822-1890)

© MIDDLE TEMPLE LIBRARY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Dantes Inferno, suicides and the Harpies Featured Print

Dantes Inferno, suicides and the Harpies

Dante's Inferno. Canto XIII, line 11: Here [suicide tree] the brute Harpies make their nest (at right: Dante and Virgil). Italian poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) wrote his epic poem Divina Commedia (The Divine Comedy) between 1308 and his death in 1321. Totalling 14, 233 lines, and divided into three parts (Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso), it is considered the greatest literary work in the Italian language and a world masterpiece. It is a comprehensive survey of medieval theology, literature and thought. Artwork by French artist Gustave Dore (1832-1883); engraving from The Vision of Hell (1868), Henry Francis Cary's English translation of the Inferno

© MIDDLE TEMPLE LIBRARY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY