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Choose from 811 pictures in our Shipping collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Henry Scott Tuke's French brigantine 'Julie of Nantes' at the Mill Dam, Falmouth, Cornwall. Around 1886 Featured Print

Henry Scott Tuke's French brigantine 'Julie of Nantes' at the Mill Dam, Falmouth, Cornwall. Around 1886

The artist, Henry Scott Tuke (1858-1929), purchased Julie of Nantes in 1886 for use as a floating studio. It is thought that he can be seen standing at the bow of the ship. Henry Scott Tuke was born into a Quaker family in Lawrence Street, York. In 1859 the family moved to Falmouth, where his father Daniel Tuke, a physician, established a practice. Tuke was encouraged to draw and paint from an early age and some of his earliest drawings, aged four or five years old, were published in 1895. In 1875, he enrolled in the Slade School of Art. Initially his father paid for his tuition but in 1877 Tuke won a scholarship, which allowed him to continue his training at the Slade and in Italy in 1880. From 1881 to 1883 he was in Paris where he met the artist Jules Bastien-Lepage, who encouraged him to paint en plein air (in the open air) a method of working that came to dominate his practice. While studying in France, Tuke decided to move to Newlyn Cornwall where many of his Slade and Parisian friends had already formed the Newlyn School of painters. He received several lucrative commissions there, after exhibiting his work at the Royal Academy of Art in London. In 1885, he returned to Falmouth where many of his major works were produced. He became an established artist and was elected to full membership of the Royal Academy in 1914. Tuke suffered a heart attack in 1928 and died in March 1929. In his will he left generous amounts of money to some of the men who, as boys, had been his models. Today he is remembered mainly for his oil paintings of young men, but in addition to his achievements as a figurative painter, he was an established maritime artist and produced as many portraits of sailing ships as he did human figures. He was a prolific artist, over 1,300 works are listed and more are still being discovered. Photographer: Unknown.

© From the collection of the RIC

Map of the City of Dublin, 1797 Featured Print

Map of the City of Dublin, 1797

Map of the City of Dublin, Ireland. Published in 1797, this map includes details of the canals being built at the time. Canal Harbour (lower right) connects across bottom with the Grand Canal (lower left). The Royal Canal (upper right and a branch at upper centre) was a competing canal. Running across centre is the River Liffey. Borders of the city's wards are marked in coloured lines, with a key at lower right, next to the city coat of arms. The scale at lower left is in both English and Irish miles. In 1797, Ireland was ruled by Britain, and this map was published by the geographer to King George III and the Prince of Wales (the future King George IV).

© LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, GEOGRAPHY AND MAP DIVISION/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Ro-Ro PCC Car Transporting Vessel Featured Print

Ro-Ro PCC Car Transporting Vessel

Ro-Ro PCC Car Transporting Vessel in Southampton Water. Since 1970 the market for exporting and importing cars has increased dramatically and the number and type of RO/ROs has increased also. Today's pure car carriers (PCC) and their close cousins, the Pure Car/Truck Carrier (PCTC) are distinctive ships with a box-like superstructure running the entire length and breadth of the hull, fully enclosing and protecting the cargo. They typically have a stern ramp and a side ramp for dual loading of vehicles, as well as extensive automatic fire control systems. The PCTC has liftable decks to increase vertical clearance as well as heavier decks for "high and heavy" cargo. Some vessels are capable of carrying up to 6, 500 vehicles.

© DAVID PARKER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY