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Second Continental Congress Collection

"The Second Continental Congress: Paving the Path to Independence" On 4 July 1776

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Second Continental Congress Collection: Signed copy of the Declaration of Independence, 4 July 1776
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Second Continental Congress Collection: Signed copy of the Declaration of Independence, 4 July 1776
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Second Continental Congress Collection: Declaration of Independence of the 13 United States of America of 1776, 1823 (copper
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Second Continental Congress Collection: DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. John Hancocks Defiance. Lithograph, 1876, by Currier & Ives
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Second Continental Congress Collection: Detail of the beginning of the Declaration of Independence, 4 July 1776
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Second Continental Congress Collection: The Fitzwilliam copy of the Olive Branch Petition, 1775
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Second Continental Congress Collection: na
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Second Continental Congress Collection: Declaration of Independence, 1776, 1st January 1823 (facsimile on vellum)
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Second Continental Congress Collection: Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from Le Costume Ancien et Moderne
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Second Continental Congress Collection: The back of a U. S. two dollar note depicting the signing of the Declaration of Independence at
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Second Continental Congress Collection: A key to the statesmen portrayed in John Trumbulls painting The Declaration of Independence
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Second Continental Congress Collection: Signing of the Declaration of Independence on 4 July 1776. Drawing by Henry A. Ogden (1856-1936)
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Second Continental Congress Collection: FRANKLIN CREDENTIALS, 1778. Letter from the Continental Congress and its President
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Second Continental Congress Collection: DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. Detail of the third and fourth lines of the Declaration
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Second Continental Congress Collection: CONGRESS: COMMITTEE, 1788. Printed report, 11 June 1788, from a committee of the
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Second Continental Congress Collection: JAMES DUANE (1733-1797). American lawyer, jurist, and Revolutionary leader
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Second Continental Congress Collection: American merchant, politician and President of the Continental Congress, 1781-82
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Second Continental Congress Collection: John Nixon giving the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence in the State House
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Second Continental Congress Collection: The first printing of the Declaration of Independence, also known as the Dunlop Broadside
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Second Continental Congress Collection: American soldier and traitor. Benedict Arnolds commission as major general in the Continental
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Second Continental Congress Collection: The signing of the Declaration of Independence in Congress at the Independence Hall, Philadelphia
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Second Continental Congress Collection: The First Announcement of the Great Declaration (of Independence)
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Second Continental Congress Collection: Broadside, 13 June 1776, from the Provincial Congress in New York
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Second Continental Congress Collection: American Revolutionary leader. Halls autograph signature on the U. S
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Second Continental Congress Collection: American Revolutionary leader. Facsimile of the holograph signature affixed to the Declaration of
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Second Continental Congress Collection: Facsimilie of the original draft of the Declaration of Independence with portraits of the signers
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Second Continental Congress Collection: A 20th century film depiction of the signing of the Declaration of Independence at Independence
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Second Continental Congress Collection: The Signing of the Declaration of Independence at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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Second Continental Congress Collection: The building in which the Continental Congress of 1783 held its fall session at Annapolis
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Second Continental Congress Collection: DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. Signing of the Declaration of Independence at Independence Hall in
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Second Continental Congress Collection: American lawyer and political leader. Waltons autograph signature on the U. S
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Second Continental Congress Collection: American merchant, politician and President of the Continental Congress, 1781-82
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Second Continental Congress Collection: The signing of the Declaration of Independence in Congress, at the Independence Hall
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Second Continental Congress Collection: (1732-1799) accepting the election to Commander in Chief in the Continental Congress, 15 June
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Second Continental Congress Collection: John Hancocks Defiance. Lithograph, 1876, by Currier & Ives
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Second Continental Congress Collection: VOTING INDEPENDENCE, 1776. The Continental Congress voting in favor of independence, 1776
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Second Continental Congress Collection: CARPENTERs HALL. Carpenters Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, meeting-place of the First
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Second Continental Congress Collection: EVRV2A-00126
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Second Continental Congress Collection: EVRV2A-00141

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"The Second Continental Congress: Paving the Path to Independence" On 4 July 1776, history was made as the Second Continental Congress gathered in Philadelphia's Independence Hall. Amongst the esteemed delegates, a signed copy of the Declaration of Independence marked a pivotal moment for the thirteen United States of America. This powerful document boldly declared their separation from British rule and laid the foundation for a new nation. The significance of this occasion is immortalized through various artistic representations throughout history. A lithograph by Currier & Ives captures John Hancock's defiant signature on that fateful day in 1876, showcasing his unwavering commitment to freedom. The Fitzwilliam copy of the Olive Branch Petition from 1775 serves as a reminder that peaceful resolutions were sought before resorting to independence. Independence Hall itself stands proudly in Philadelphia, serving as an enduring symbol of liberty and democracy. Its image graces Le Costume Ancien et Moderne, emphasizing its historical importance and architectural beauty. Even currency pays homage to this monumental event; on the back of a U. S. Two-dollar note, we see an illustration depicting those brave individuals signing their names with determination at Independence Hall. Henry A. Ogden's drawing transports us back to that very room where these courageous men put pen to paper, forever changing the course of American history. In addition to these visual representations lies evidence within written records such as Franklin Credentials from 1778—a letter affirming Benjamin Franklin's role in representing America abroad during these tumultuous times. Over time, celebrations have emerged around this historic date—Independence Day—an annual commemoration filled with pride and patriotism across our great nation since its engraving in 1853. The Second Continental Congress remains an indelible chapter in American history—a gathering that united thirteen colonies under one cause: freedom from tyranny. Their actions paved the way for future generations who would continue striving towards equality and justice for all.