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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Polynesian Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 664 pictures in our Polynesian collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Reception of Captain Cook in Hapaee'. Ceremonial reception of James Cook Featured Print

The Reception of Captain Cook in Hapaee'. Ceremonial reception of James Cook

The Reception of Captain Cook in Hapaee'. Ceremonial reception of James Cook (1728-1779) British navigator, explorer and cartographer on his visit to the Friendly Islands (Tonga) on his second voyage in 1773. Engraving from Captain Cook's Original Voyages Round the World (Woodbridge, Suffolk, c1815).

© Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group

Green turtle Featured Print

Green turtle

Green turtle. Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) swimming beside a coral reef. This turtle uses its powerful paddle-like front limbs to propel itself through the water. Its name derives from the colour of its flesh. The green turtle is one of the largest turtles, growing up to 150 centimetres in length. Found in all warm tropical waters, C. mydas is almost completely aquatic. Only the female ever leaves the water: she does so to nest, returning to the beach where she was born to lay her eggs. Photographed off Palau Sipadan, Malaysia.

© MATTHEW OLDFIELD/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Carrier crab Featured Print

Carrier crab

Carrier crab (Homolochunia kullar). This crab lives at a depth of 500-1000 metres in the Pacific Ocean around New Caledonia and Eastern Australia. Unusually, it has rear and front pincers. The rear pincers, located at the tip of its last pair of legs, enable the crab to grasp sponges or sea anemones, which it holds above itself for camouflage. Carrier crabs (family Homolidae) are primitive crabs, and have their sexual orifices at the base of their legs on the under side, whereas the more advanced crabs have these sexual orifices under the breastplate. The carapace (shell) of this specimen measures 3cm wide.

© GILLES MERMET/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY