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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Peoples Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 710 pictures in our Peoples collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


British Empire world map, 19th century Featured Print

British Empire world map, 19th century

British Empire world map. This world map shows the 19th-century British Empire (pink) and its indigenous peoples. Five illustrations (clockwise from upper left) show the people of Australia, North America, southern Africa, Europe and Asia. Two tables (top left and top right) list the imperial possessions by area and population, with the totals being over 7 million square miles and nearly 165 million people. Some years of acquisition are also shown. This map was produced in the late 1850s by the Scottish cartographer John Bartholomew (1831-1893). Africa includes the 1856 route taken by the Scottish explorer David Livingstone

© LIBRARY OF CONGRESS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Old Sami Man from Finnmark County, Norway Featured Print

Old Sami Man from Finnmark County, Norway

An old Sami Man from Finnmark County in the extreme northeast of Norway. The Sami peoples (also spelled Saami and also known as Lapps, although this term is considered derogatory) are an arctic indigenous people inhabiting Sapmi, which today encompasses parts of far northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. Date: circa 1910s

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection

Sudan - A group of Hadendoa Warriors Featured Print

Sudan - A group of Hadendoa Warriors

Sudan - A group of Hadendoa Warriors. The Hadendoa is the name of a nomadic subdivision of the Beja people, known for their support of the Mahdiyyah rebellion during the 1880s to 1890s. The area historically inhabited by the Hadendoa is today parts of Sudan, Egypt and Eritrea. Their elaborate hairdressing (pictured here) gained them the name of "Fuzzy-wuzzies" among the British troops during the Mahdist War. Date: circa 1920s

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection