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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Paleogene Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 51 pictures in our Paleogene collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


An adult Paraceratherium compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros Featured Print

An adult Paraceratherium compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros

An adult Paraceratherium (AKA Indricotherium and Baluchitherium) from 30 million years ago is compared to a modern adult White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The Paraceratherium is 18 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 40, 000 pounds*, while the White Rhinoceros is 6 feet tall at the shoulder and weighs 7, 000 pounds.
Paraceratherium is the largest mammal known to have walked the Earth and are from an extinct family of hornless rhinoceroses that ranged across North America, Europe, and Asia from 60 to 20 million years ago.
* Values are estimates only based upon available paleontological data

© Walter Myers/Stocktrek Images

A Paraceratherium mother grazes on leaves and twigs of a poplar tree Featured Print

A Paraceratherium mother grazes on leaves and twigs of a poplar tree

A Paraceratherium mother grazes on leaves and twigs of a poplar tree while her infant son stands nearby in a scene from 30 million years ago during the Rupelian Stage of the Oligocene Epoch in northwest China. Also in this scene on the lower left is a Palaeolagus, an extinct genus of the order lagomorpha, which includes modern hares, rabbits and pikas. On the lower right is a Palaeosciurus, the earliest known ground squirrel. Flying overhead are passerine ancestors of today's perching songbirds.
More massive than a modern African elephant, Paraceratherium is believed to be the largest mammal ever to have walked the Earth. Adult Paraceratherium are estimated to have been 18 ft tall at the shoulder with a maximum raised head height of 26 ft. They may have weighed as much as 20 tons. Related to modern rhinoceroses, Paraceratherium became extinct about 23 million years ago

© Walter Myers/Stocktrek Images

North America, Early Tertiary period Featured Print

North America, Early Tertiary period

North America, Early Tertiary period. Image 8 of 9. Computer artwork of the Palaeocene epoch stage (approximately 60 million years ago) of a sequence showing the formation of the North American continent. The Palaeocene epoch lies in the Tertiary period, which extended from 65 to 1.6 million years ago and began with the extinction of the dinosaurs. The continents are slowly moved over the surface of the Earth by currents in the fluid mantle below the crust. Over millions of years the continents moved into the positions they are in today. The present day position of the United States of America (USA) is shown outlined in white. For North America at different points throughout prehistory, see images E402/163 to E402/171

© GARY HINCKS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY