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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Mollusc Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 780 pictures in our Mollusc collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Roman seafood mosaic Featured Print

Roman seafood mosaic

Roman seafood mosaic. Mosaics consist of small pieces of coloured glass or stone, used to form an image or pattern on a floor or wall. This marine fauna mosaic is from the House of the Faun, in Pompeii, Italy, and accurately depicts over twenty forms of fish, shellfish and eels. At centre, an octopus attacks a lobster. Surrounding them are dogfish, morays, sea basses, sea breams, mullets, and electric rays. This mosaic is displayed in the Archaeological Museum of Naples, Italy

© SHEILA TERRY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Ammonite fossil, SEM Featured Print

Ammonite fossil, SEM

Ammonite fossil, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). Ammonites were invertebrates and lived in the sea. They were molluscs that formed a spiral shell to protect their soft body. The lines on the shell mark chambers added as the ammonite grew. It lived in the newest and largest chamber. Shells ranged in width from under 1 centimetre to over 1 metre. Ammonites most closely resemble the present-day nautilus. They first appear in the fossil record around 400 million years ago and became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous period 65 million years ago. Magnification: x30 when printed 10cm wide

© STEVE GSCHMEISSNER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Ammonites Featured Print

Ammonites

Ammonites. Computer artwork of ammonites in the sea during the Devonian period. This lasted from around 408 to 360 million years ago. Ammonites were marine cephalopod molluscs, related to the similar-looking modern-day nautilus. Air chambers in their spiral shells enabled them to control their buoyancy. It is thought that they could withdraw their body into their shell for protection. These ammonites were generated for use in the Devonian Ocean Simulator, an interactive virtual reality simulation of marine wildlife at this time

© CHRISTIAN DARKIN/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY