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Microbes Collection

Microbes, the invisible world within us and around us, hold a captivating story of survival and impact

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Salmonella bacteria, SEM

Salmonella bacteria, SEM
Salmonella bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). Each rod-shaped structure is an individual bacterium. These bacteria occur mainly in human and animal intestines

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Salmonella bacteria, SEM

Salmonella bacteria, SEM
Salmonella bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria can cause food poisoning when eaten in contaminated food

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Anthrax cultures, historical diagram

Anthrax cultures, historical diagram
Anthrax cultures. 1876 diagram of Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) bacteria cultured by Robert Koch. Along with Louis Pasteur, Koch is considered the founder of modern medical bacteriology

Background imageMicrobes Collection: E. coli bacteria, SEM

E. coli bacteria, SEM
E. coli bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria. These bacteria are a normal part of the intestinal flora in humans and other animals

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Coloured TEM of Yersinia pestis bacteria

Coloured TEM of Yersinia pestis bacteria
False colour transmission electron micrograph (SEM) of Yersinia pestis, a species of Gram negative, non- motile, capsulated

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Candida fungus, SEM

Candida fungus, SEM
Candida fungus. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of budding threads (hyphae) of a Candida fungus. The budding areas are where asexual reproduction is producing new fungus cells

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Norovirus particles, TEM

Norovirus particles, TEM
Norovirus particles. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of norovirus particles. Norovirus is a genus of RNA (ribonucleic acid)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Tuberculosis bacteria

Tuberculosis bacteria. Computer artwork of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. These Gram- positive rod-shaped bacteria cause the disease tuberculosis

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Spiral spore chain of Streptomyces bacteria

Spiral spore chain of Streptomyces bacteria

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium

Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium
Salmonella sp. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Salmonella sp. bacterium. The cell is rod-shaped with long hair-like flagellae

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Flagellate bacteria

Flagellate bacteria. Computer artwork of a rod- shaped bacteria with polar flagella. Bacteria with a morphology similar to this include Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella sp

Background imageMicrobes Collection: E. coli bacterium

E. coli bacterium
Escherichia coli. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Escherichia coli bacterium. E. coli are Gram-negative bacilli (rod-shaped) bacteria

Background imageMicrobes Collection: E. coli bacteria

E. coli bacteria
False-colour transmission electron micrograph of the bacterium Escherichia coli, a normal inhabitant of the human intestine

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria
Staphylococcus aureus. Coloured Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM) of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These Gram-positive bacteria cause skin infections

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Yoghurt bacteria

Yoghurt bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus (spherical) and Lactobacillus bulgar- icus (rod-shaped) in live yoghurt. S

Background imageMicrobes Collection: E. coli bacteria, SEM

E. coli bacteria, SEM
E. coli bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria (purple) taken from the small intestine of a child. E

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageMicrobes Collection: E. coli bacterium, TEM

E. coli bacterium, TEM
E. coli bacterium, coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM). E. coli are Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the normal flora of the human gut

Background imageMicrobes Collection: MRSA resistant Staphylococcus bacteria

MRSA resistant Staphylococcus bacteria
MRSA: resistant Staphylococcus bacteria. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a deadly cluster of MRSA Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Infections spread by sneezing, artwork C013 / 5949

Infections spread by sneezing, artwork C013 / 5949
Infections spread by sneezing. Computer artwork showing virus particles (virions, blue) and bacteria (rod-shaped) in the spray produced by someone when they sneeze

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Salmonella bacteria, artwork C013 / 8818

Salmonella bacteria, artwork C013 / 8818
Salmonella bacteria, computer artwork. Salmonella sp. bacteria are gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria that have flagella (hair-like structures) that they use for locomotion

Background imageMicrobes Collection: E. coli bacterium, TEM

E. coli bacterium, TEM
E. coli bacterium. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Escherichia coli bacterium in the early stages of binary fission, the process by which the bacterium divides

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageMicrobes Collection: The democratic microbes

The democratic microbes. Illustration shows Puck as a professor showing a slide of the germs infecting the Democratic Party; shown are William Jennings Bryan labeled Bryanism

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, SEM

Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, SEM
Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-positive rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Cholera bacteria, artwork

Cholera bacteria, artwork
Cholera bacteria. Artwork of Vibrio cholerae bacteria in the small intestine. These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria have a single polar flagellum (tail-like structure)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: E. coli 0157: H7 bacteria

E. coli 0157: H7 bacteria
E. coli 0157:H7 bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 bacteria, cause of foodborne illness

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Salmonella bacterium dividing, SEM

Salmonella bacterium dividing, SEM
Salmonella bacterium dividing. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of of a Salmonella bacterium dividing. The two new daughter cells are seen at upper right and lower left

Background imageMicrobes Collection: False-colour TEM of Salmonella typhi

False-colour TEM of Salmonella typhi

Background imageMicrobes Collection: False-colour TEM of bacterium E. Coli

False-colour TEM of bacterium E. Coli
False colour transmission electron micrograph of the bacterium Escherichia coli, a normal member of human intestinal flora

Background imageMicrobes Collection: E. coli bacterium dividing

E. coli bacterium dividing

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Chains of Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria

Chains of Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria

Background imageMicrobes Collection: The Microbe (colour litho)

The Microbe (colour litho)
8633854 The Microbe (colour litho) by Thompson, George Henry (1853-1933); Private Collection; (add.info.: The Microbe. Illustration for The Poet and Other Animals by Harold Richardon (Ernest Nister)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Radiolaria, types of protozoa (colour litho)

Radiolaria, types of protozoa (colour litho)
8663507 Radiolaria, types of protozoa (colour litho) by Haeckel, Ernst (1824-1919) (after); Private Collection; (add.info.: Radiolaria, types of protozoa)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Haemophilus influenzae, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Haemophilus influenzae, 1906 (litho)
3501914 Colony of Haemophilus influenzae, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Mycobacterium leprae, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Mycobacterium leprae, 1906 (litho)
3501912 Colony of Mycobacterium leprae, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Micrococcus Gonorrhoea, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Micrococcus Gonorrhoea, 1906 (litho)
3501903 Colony of Micrococcus Gonorrhoea, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Streptococcus pneumoniae with and without bubble capsule, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Streptococcus pneumoniae with and without bubble capsule, 1906 (litho)
3501899 Colony of Streptococcus pneumoniae with and without bubble capsule, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Streptococcus Pneumoniae, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Streptococcus Pneumoniae, 1906 (litho)
3501898 Colony of Streptococcus Pneumoniae, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Spirillum of the Lyme disease causing bacteria, Spirochaetes Borrelia Recurrentis

Spirillum of the Lyme disease causing bacteria, Spirochaetes Borrelia Recurrentis, in blood sample, 1906 (litho)
3501919 Spirillum of the Lyme disease causing bacteria, Spirochaetes Borrelia Recurrentis, in blood sample, 1906 (litho) by German School

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Vibrio cholerae, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Vibrio cholerae, 1906 (litho)
3501918 Colony of Vibrio cholerae, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Clostridium tetani with spores, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Clostridium tetani with spores, 1906 (litho)
3501913 Colony of Clostridium tetani with spores, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, 1906 (litho)
3501910 Colony of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: A colony of Staphylococcus pyogenes after cell division, 1906 (litho)

A colony of Staphylococcus pyogenes after cell division, 1906 (litho)
3501897 A colony of Staphylococcus pyogenes after cell division, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Streptococcus pyogenes, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Streptococcus pyogenes, 1906 (litho)
3501894 Colony of Streptococcus pyogenes, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Yersinia pestis, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Yersinia pestis, 1906 (litho)
3501917 Colony of Yersinia pestis, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)

Background imageMicrobes Collection: Colony of Salmonella Typhi showing Bacilli with flagella, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Salmonella Typhi showing Bacilli with flagella, 1906 (litho)
3501916 Colony of Salmonella Typhi showing Bacilli with flagella, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info)



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Microbes, the invisible world within us and around us, hold a captivating story of survival and impact. Through powerful imaging techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we can explore their intricate forms and unravel their secrets. In one frame, E. Coli bacteria appear as tiny rods under SEM, reminding us of their prevalence in our gut microbiome. Another image showcases Salmonella bacteria through SEM, highlighting the potential danger they pose to our health if not handled with caution. A colored TEM image reveals Yersinia pestis bacteria responsible for the devastating plague outbreaks throughout history. The vibrant hues bring attention to the severity of this pathogen's impact on humanity. Switching gears to fungi, Candida fungus takes center stage under SEM. Its branching structures captivate our imagination as we ponder its role in infections and diseases. Anthrax cultures depicted in a historical diagram remind us of the dark chapters where bioweapons threatened lives. This visual representation serves as a reminder of how they are be harnessed for destruction or manipulated for good. Norovirus particles captured by TEM showcase their spherical shape – these minuscule agents are notorious for causing gastrointestinal distress during outbreaks. Tuberculosis bacteria come into focus next; their presence is marked by rod-shaped organisms that invade lung tissue silently but relentlessly affecting millions worldwide each year. Spiral spore chains formed by Streptomyces bacteria create an enchanting pattern when observed through microscopic lenses. These soil-dwelling microorganisms contribute significantly to antibiotic production while shaping ecosystems beneath our feet. Flagellate bacteria display elegance with their whip-like appendages propelling them forward towards new habitats or resources - an evolutionary marvel worth contemplating upon seeing them up close under SEM once again. Lastly, Staphylococcus aureus bacterium reminds us that even seemingly harmless species can turn deadly when given the opportunity to cause infections if left unchecked within vulnerable individuals' bodies. Microbes, whether they be E.