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Micro Organisms Collection

Microorganisms, the tiny wonders of life that exist all around us, are a fascinating subject to explore

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Foraminifera, light micrograph C016 / 8597

Foraminifera, light micrograph C016 / 8597
Foraminifera. Interphase contrast light micrograph of a selection of different foraminifera. Foraminifera are marine single-celled protozoa that construct

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Plankton, artwork C016 / 3447

Plankton, artwork C016 / 3447
Plankton. Artwork of plankton as viewed under a magnifying glass

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Salmonella bacteria, SEM

Salmonella bacteria, SEM
Salmonella bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). Each rod-shaped structure is an individual bacterium. These bacteria occur mainly in human and animal intestines

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Salmonella bacteria, SEM

Salmonella bacteria, SEM
Salmonella bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria can cause food poisoning when eaten in contaminated food

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Anthrax cultures, historical diagram

Anthrax cultures, historical diagram
Anthrax cultures. 1876 diagram of Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) bacteria cultured by Robert Koch. Along with Louis Pasteur, Koch is considered the founder of modern medical bacteriology

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: E. coli bacteria, SEM

E. coli bacteria, SEM
E. coli bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria. These bacteria are a normal part of the intestinal flora in humans and other animals

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Coloured TEM of Yersinia pestis bacteria

Coloured TEM of Yersinia pestis bacteria
False colour transmission electron micrograph (SEM) of Yersinia pestis, a species of Gram negative, non- motile, capsulated

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Candida fungus, SEM

Candida fungus, SEM
Candida fungus. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of budding threads (hyphae) of a Candida fungus. The budding areas are where asexual reproduction is producing new fungus cells

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Norovirus particles, TEM

Norovirus particles, TEM
Norovirus particles. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of norovirus particles. Norovirus is a genus of RNA (ribonucleic acid)

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Tuberculosis bacteria

Tuberculosis bacteria. Computer artwork of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. These Gram- positive rod-shaped bacteria cause the disease tuberculosis

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Spiral spore chain of Streptomyces bacteria

Spiral spore chain of Streptomyces bacteria

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium

Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium
Salmonella sp. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Salmonella sp. bacterium. The cell is rod-shaped with long hair-like flagellae

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Flagellate bacteria

Flagellate bacteria. Computer artwork of a rod- shaped bacteria with polar flagella. Bacteria with a morphology similar to this include Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella sp

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: E. coli bacterium

E. coli bacterium
Escherichia coli. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Escherichia coli bacterium. E. coli are Gram-negative bacilli (rod-shaped) bacteria

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: E. coli bacteria

E. coli bacteria
False-colour transmission electron micrograph of the bacterium Escherichia coli, a normal inhabitant of the human intestine

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria
Staphylococcus aureus. Coloured Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM) of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These Gram-positive bacteria cause skin infections

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Yoghurt bacteria

Yoghurt bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus (spherical) and Lactobacillus bulgar- icus (rod-shaped) in live yoghurt. S

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: E. coli bacteria, SEM

E. coli bacteria, SEM
E. coli bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria (purple) taken from the small intestine of a child. E

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: E. coli bacterium, TEM

E. coli bacterium, TEM
E. coli bacterium, coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM). E. coli are Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the normal flora of the human gut

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: MRSA resistant Staphylococcus bacteria

MRSA resistant Staphylococcus bacteria
MRSA: resistant Staphylococcus bacteria. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a deadly cluster of MRSA Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Water bear, light micrograph C016 / 8581

Water bear, light micrograph C016 / 8581
Water bear, differential interference contrast (DIC) light micrograph. Water bears, or tardigrades, (phylum Tardigrada) are small, water-dwelling

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: False-coloured SEM (Scanning Electron Micrograph) of a Tardigrade (Tardigrada) amongst moss

False-coloured SEM (Scanning Electron Micrograph) of a Tardigrade (Tardigrada) amongst moss, from Peak District National Park, Derbyshire, UK. This tardigrade is approximately 0.1 millimetres long

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Infections spread by sneezing, artwork C013 / 5949

Infections spread by sneezing, artwork C013 / 5949
Infections spread by sneezing. Computer artwork showing virus particles (virions, blue) and bacteria (rod-shaped) in the spray produced by someone when they sneeze

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Salmonella bacteria, artwork C013 / 8818

Salmonella bacteria, artwork C013 / 8818
Salmonella bacteria, computer artwork. Salmonella sp. bacteria are gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria that have flagella (hair-like structures) that they use for locomotion

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: E. coli bacterium, TEM

E. coli bacterium, TEM
E. coli bacterium. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Escherichia coli bacterium in the early stages of binary fission, the process by which the bacterium divides

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Water bear, SEM C016 / 9084

Water bear, SEM C016 / 9084
Water bear (Echiniscus granulatus). Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) showing the underside of a water bear, or tardigrade (phylum Tardigrada)

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, SEM

Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, SEM
Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-positive rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Cholera bacteria, artwork

Cholera bacteria, artwork
Cholera bacteria. Artwork of Vibrio cholerae bacteria in the small intestine. These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria have a single polar flagellum (tail-like structure)

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: E. coli 0157: H7 bacteria

E. coli 0157: H7 bacteria
E. coli 0157:H7 bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 bacteria, cause of foodborne illness

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Salmonella bacterium dividing, SEM

Salmonella bacterium dividing, SEM
Salmonella bacterium dividing. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of of a Salmonella bacterium dividing. The two new daughter cells are seen at upper right and lower left

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: False-colour TEM of Salmonella typhi

False-colour TEM of Salmonella typhi

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: False-colour TEM of bacterium E. Coli

False-colour TEM of bacterium E. Coli
False colour transmission electron micrograph of the bacterium Escherichia coli, a normal member of human intestinal flora

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: E. coli bacterium dividing

E. coli bacterium dividing

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Chains of Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria

Chains of Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Focus stacked, inverted image of Diatoms on a microscope slide

Focus stacked, inverted image of Diatoms on a microscope slide. Diatoms are single-celled algae which produce approximately 25% of the oxygen we breathe as well as being responsible for approximately

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Jellyfish (Pelagia noctiluca) amongst plankton, Shetland Isles, Scotland

Jellyfish (Pelagia noctiluca) amongst plankton, Shetland Isles, Scotland

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: RF- Rear view of Basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) feeding on plankton, visible

RF- Rear view of Basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) feeding on plankton, visible as white dots on water surface near island of Coll, Inner Hebrides, Scotland, UK. June

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Marine planktonic Copepod (Sapphirina sp

Marine planktonic Copepod (Sapphirina sp.) brightly coloured copepods. Deep sea species from Atlantic Ocean off Cape Verde. Captive

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Plankton at night, Palau, Philippine Sea

Plankton at night, Palau, Philippine Sea

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Blue jellyfish (Cyanea lamarckii), feeding on small plankton, Lundy Island Marine Conservation Zone

Blue jellyfish (Cyanea lamarckii), feeding on small plankton, Lundy Island Marine Conservation Zone, Devon, England, UK, May

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Common fangtooth (Anoplogaster cornuta) deep sea species from Atlantic Ocean close to Cape Verde

Common fangtooth (Anoplogaster cornuta) deep sea species from Atlantic Ocean close to Cape Verde. Captive

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Deep sea fish (Moridae sp. ) from Atlantic Ocean off Cape Verde. Captive

Deep sea fish (Moridae sp. ) from Atlantic Ocean off Cape Verde. Captive
Deep sea fish (Moridae sp.) from Atlantic Ocean off Cape Verde. Captive

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Juvenile deep water pelagic octopus (Vitreledonella richardi) semi-translucent species

Juvenile deep water pelagic octopus (Vitreledonella richardi) semi-translucent species, from Atlantic Ocean off Cape Verde. Captive

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Larva of an Atlantic longarm octopus (Octopus defilippi) Atlantic Ocean off Cape Verde

Larva of an Atlantic longarm octopus (Octopus defilippi) Atlantic Ocean off Cape Verde. Captive

Background imageMicro Organisms Collection: Manta ray (Mobula alfredi) feeding on plankton aggregated in the lights from a boat at night

Manta ray (Mobula alfredi) feeding on plankton aggregated in the lights from a boat at night, North Ari Atoll, Maldives, Indian Ocean



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Microorganisms, the tiny wonders of life that exist all around us, are a fascinating subject to explore. Under the lens of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), we can witness their intricate structures and unravel their hidden secrets. Take E. Coli bacteria for example; when magnified through an SEM, they reveal their rod-shaped bodies with flagella protruding from one end. These microscopic creatures play crucial roles in our digestive system but can also cause infections if not properly handled. Similarly, Salmonella bacteria appear as elongated cells under SEM, reminding us of the importance of proper food handling and hygiene practices to prevent contamination. The colored transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of Yersinia pestis bacteria showcases its unique features that were responsible for devastating outbreaks like the infamous Black Death. Switching gears to fungi, Candida fungus is captured beautifully in an SEM image displaying its filamentous structure. This opportunistic pathogen can cause infections in immunocompromised individuals and highlights the need for effective antifungal treatments. Delving into history, we encounter anthrax cultures depicted in a historical diagram. This bacterium has been weaponized throughout time due to its ability to form spores resistant to harsh conditions – a chilling reminder of humanity's dark side. Norovirus particles come into focus through TEM imagery; these small viral entities are notorious for causing gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide and serve as a constant reminder about practicing good personal hygiene habits. Tuberculosis bacteria capture attention with their distinctive shape under SEM: slender rods often forming chains resembling delicate spirals. This ancient disease continues to pose significant health challenges globally despite medical advancements made over centuries. Streptomyces bacteria showcase their beauty by forming spiral spore chains visible even without high-powered microscopes. These remarkable organisms produce antibiotics vital for human health while maintaining ecological balance within soil ecosystems. Flagellate bacteria remind us that movement is not limited solely to larger organisms; these tiny creatures possess whip-like appendages that propel them through their microscopic habitats.