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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Ivory Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 780 pictures in our Ivory collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Docks of London - The London Docks Featured Print

The Docks of London - The London Docks

Incredible wealth of the Ivory Floor - One of the wealthiest corners in the London Docks. A view of the "Ivory Floor" where elephant tusks, boar tusks, narwhale horns, rhinocerous horns and sometimes mammoth tusks are ranged in incredible profusion. It is said than many, perhaps most of the tusks of elephants displayed are not of freshly killed beasts, but are old treasures of Chiefs, reluctantly surrendered, stored maybe, for centuries in remote African Villages. The picture shows men moving some of the large tusks on specially constructed trolleys.

© PA/PA Photos

Asprey Christmas presents, 1926 Featured Print

Asprey Christmas presents, 1926

Colour advertisement for Asprey of Bond Street displaying a wide variety of Christmas present ideas, including an attache case, a shagreen cigarette box, leather handbag, crocodile handbag pochette, a poker chip stand, race companion, pocket watch, clock, combined vanity and cigarette case and a shagreen hair brush with ivory comb.

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10271569

The Gullett Family, John Opie (1761-1807) Featured Print

The Gullett Family, John Opie (1761-1807)

Oil on canvas, English School, circa 1786. This family portrait by the Cornish artist John Opie, shows Christopher Gullet, Clerk of the Peace for Devon, with his wife Anne and youngest child Georgina. John Opie was born in Harmony Cottage, Trevellas, between St Agnes and Perranporth in Cornwall. He was the youngest of the five children of Edward Opie, a master carpenter, and his wife Mary (nee Tonkin). He showed a precocious talent for drawing and mathematics, and by the age of twelve he had mastered the teachings of Greek mathematician Euclid and opened an evening school for poor children where he taught reading, writing and arithmetic. His father, however, did not encourage his abilities, and apprenticed him to his own trade of carpentry. Opie's artistic abilities eventually came to the attention of local physician and satirist, Dr John Wolcot (who used the pen name Peter Pindar), who visited him at the sawmill where he was working in 1775. Recognising a great talent, Wolcot became Opie's mentor, buying him out of his apprenticeship and insisting that he come to live at his home in Truro. Wolcot provided invaluable encouragement, advice, tuition and practical help in the advancement of his early career, including obtaining many commissions for work. In 1781, having gained considerable experience as a portraitist travelling around Cornwall, Opie moved to London with Wolcot. There they lived together, having entered into a formal profit-sharing agreement. Although Opie had received a considerable artistic education from Wolcot, the doctor chose to present him as a self-taught prodigy; a portrait of a boy shown at the Society of Artists the previous year, had been described in the catalogue as "an instance of Genius, not having ever seen a picture." Wolcot introduced the "Cornish wonder" to leading artists, including Sir Joshua Reynolds, who was to compare him to Caravaggio and Velazquez.

© RIC