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Infect Collection

"Infect: Unseen Threats and Devastating Consequences" Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium: Revealing the microscopic world

Background imageInfect Collection: A map from On the Mode of Communication of Cholera, 1855 (litho)

A map from On the Mode of Communication of Cholera, 1855 (litho)
1195411 A map from On the Mode of Communication of Cholera, 1855 (litho) by Snow, John (1813-58) (after); 22, 5x14, 2 cm; Private Collection; (add.info.: Snow)

Background imageInfect Collection: Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium

Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium
Salmonella sp. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Salmonella sp. bacterium. The cell is rod-shaped with long hair-like flagellae

Background imageInfect Collection: The fourth plague of Egypt, from a book of Bible Pictures, c. 1250 (vellum)

The fourth plague of Egypt, from a book of Bible Pictures, c. 1250 (vellum)
MMT215683 The fourth plague of Egypt, from a book of Bible Pictures, c.1250 (vellum) by Brailes, William de (fl.c.1230); Musee Marmottan Monet, Paris, France; English, out of copyright

Background imageInfect Collection: TEM of HIV (AIDS) viruses budding from a T-cell

TEM of HIV (AIDS) viruses budding from a T-cell
AIDS virus. Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a T-lymphocyte blood cell infected with Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of AIDS

Background imageInfect Collection: Clostridium perfringens bacterium with spore

Clostridium perfringens bacterium with spore
False-colour transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Clostridium perfringens bacterium with endospore. This species of Gram-positive

Background imageInfect Collection: Proteus mirabilis bacterium

Proteus mirabilis bacterium
False-colour transmission electron micrograph of the bacterium Proteus mirabilis. It is an enterobacterium which is present normally in the human intestine

Background imageInfect Collection: Common Ash (Fraxinus excelsior) dieback of leaves, caused by Ash Dieback (Chalara fraxinea)

Common Ash (Fraxinus excelsior) dieback of leaves, caused by Ash Dieback (Chalara fraxinea) fungal disease, Norfolk, England, June

Background imageInfect Collection: Chalara dieback of ash sign in woodland with trees infected with highly contagious fungal disease

Chalara dieback of ash sign in woodland with trees infected with highly contagious fungal disease, Lower Wood Reserve, Ashwellthorpe, Norfolk, England, November 2012

Background imageInfect Collection: Dairy farming, young dairy heifer, with Ringworm infection, close-up of head, North Yorkshire

Dairy farming, young dairy heifer, with Ringworm infection, close-up of head, North Yorkshire, England, November

Background imageInfect Collection: Cattle farming, crossbred dairy calves, standing in straw pen with holly branches hanging to help

Cattle farming, crossbred dairy calves, standing in straw pen with holly branches hanging to help prevent ringworm, Congleton, Cheshire, England, March

Background imageInfect Collection: Domestic Goat, Saanen kid, with Pinkeye disease, close-up of head, in straw yard, Lancashire

Domestic Goat, Saanen kid, with Pinkeye disease, close-up of head, in straw yard, Lancashire, England, February

Background imageInfect Collection: HIV infection, artwork

HIV infection, artwork
HIV infection. Computer artwork of HIV particles in the bloodstream

Background imageInfect Collection: Malaria infection cycle, artwork

Malaria infection cycle, artwork. Life cycle of the Plasmodium parasite that causes malaria, which can cause coma and death. At upper left, a female Anopheles mosquito bites and infects a person

Background imageInfect Collection: Cultivated Crabapple (Malus sp. ) close-up of leaves, infected with Cedar-apple Rust

Cultivated Crabapple (Malus sp. ) close-up of leaves, infected with Cedar-apple Rust
Cultivated Crabapple (Malus sp.) close-up of leaves, infected with Cedar-apple Rust (Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae), U.S.A

Background imageInfect Collection: Barley (Hordeum vulgare) close-up of ears, infected with Loose Smut (Ustilago nuda f. sp)

Barley (Hordeum vulgare) close-up of ears, infected with Loose Smut (Ustilago nuda f. sp. hordei) fungal disease
Barley (Hordeum vulgare) close-up of ears, infected with Loose Smut (Ustilago nuda f.sp.hordei) fungal disease, Lincolnshire, England, june

Background imageInfect Collection: Grasshopper (Orthoptera sp. ) adult, killed by Pathogenic Fungus (Entomophthora sp)

Grasshopper (Orthoptera sp. ) adult, killed by Pathogenic Fungus (Entomophthora sp)
Grasshopper (Orthoptera sp.) adult, killed by Pathogenic Fungus (Entomophthora sp.) infection, fungus causes grasshopper to climb stalk before dying so spores will spread further, Pyrenees, Ariege

Background imageInfect Collection: Marsh Frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) dead adult, killed by fungal disease, at edge of pond habitat

Marsh Frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) dead adult, killed by fungal disease, at edge of pond habitat, Italy, april

Background imageInfect Collection: Agile Frog (Rana dalmatina) immature, close-up of underside showing fungal disease and infections

Agile Frog (Rana dalmatina) immature, close-up of underside showing fungal disease and infections, Italy, may

Background imageInfect Collection: AIDS viruses budding from T-cell

AIDS viruses budding from T-cell
AIDS viruses. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of rounded Human Immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) budding from the surface of an infected T-lymphocyte blood cell (T-cell)

Background imageInfect Collection: Budding HIV particles, TEM

Budding HIV particles, TEM
Budding HIV particles. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of HIV particles (blue and yellow) budding from the membrane of the host cell (orange)

Background imageInfect Collection: Budding HIV particle, computer artwork

Budding HIV particle, computer artwork
Budding HIV particle. Computer artwork of an HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) particle (green) exiting a T-lymphocyte (a type of white blood cell, lower left)

Background imageInfect Collection: Col TEM of HIV viruses budding from a T-cell

Col TEM of HIV viruses budding from a T-cell
AIDS virus. Coloured Transmission electron micrograph of a T-lymphocyte blood cell infected with Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of AIDS

Background imageInfect Collection: Illustration of HTLV-1 infected T4-lymphocyte cell

Illustration of HTLV-1 infected T4-lymphocyte cell
Illustration of a T4-lymphocyte cell infected with Human T-lymphotropic Virus type I (HTLV-I) which causes leukaemia. The leukaemia is adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma

Background imageInfect Collection: F / col TEM of Corynebacterium diphtheria

F / col TEM of Corynebacterium diphtheria
False-colour transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of Corynebacterium diphtheria, showing a number of the Gram-positive, non-sporing

Background imageInfect Collection: Corynebacterium diphtheria bacteria

Corynebacterium diphtheria bacteria

Background imageInfect Collection: Clostridium perfringens bacterium

Clostridium perfringens bacterium
False-colour transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of Clostridium perfringens (alternative name Clostridium welchii or Welchs bacillus), an individual Gram-positive, anaerobic

Background imageInfect Collection: Clostridium perfringens bacteria

Clostridium perfringens bacteria
False-colour scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of chains of the Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore- forming bacteria Clostridium perfringens (also known as Clostridium welchii or Welchs bacillus)

Background imageInfect Collection: Bacteroides gingivalis bacteria

Bacteroides gingivalis bacteria
Coloured transmission electron micrograph of the bacteria Bacteroides gingivalis (formerly Bacteroides melaninogenicus asaccharolyticus)

Background imageInfect Collection: Coloured TEM of Rickettsiae bacterium

Coloured TEM of Rickettsiae bacterium
False-colour shadow transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an individual bacterium of genus Rickettsiae, a group of very small, non- motile, rod-like, Gram-negative bacteria

Background imageInfect Collection: Coxiella burnetti bacterium dividing

Coxiella burnetti bacterium dividing
Coxiella burnetti. False-colour transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of the rickettsia-like bacteria Coxiella burnetti. Here, the organism is dividing in two, with cell contents duplicated

Background imageInfect Collection: Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium

Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium
Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium, cause of tuberculosis (TB) in humans. M

Background imageInfect Collection: Fusobacterium nucleatum bacterium

Fusobacterium nucleatum bacterium
Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a transverse section through a Fusobacterium nucleatum bacterium. In this section the internal structures of the cell resemble a " face"

Background imageInfect Collection: Clostridium tetani bacterial spore

Clostridium tetani bacterial spore
False-colour transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Clostridium tetani bacterial spore. The bacterium causes tetanus (lockjaw)

Background imageInfect Collection: Bordetella pertussis bacterium

Bordetella pertussis bacterium
False colour transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a thin section of the whooping cough bacteria, Bordetella pertussis. The whooping cough bacteria parasitise only humans

Background imageInfect Collection: Coloured TEM of Salmonella bacteria

Coloured TEM of Salmonella bacteria
Salmonella sp. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a cluster of Salmonella sp. bacteria. The cells are rod-shaped with long hair- like flagellae

Background imageInfect Collection: Clostridium tetani bacteria

Clostridium tetani bacteria
False-colour scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Clostridium tetani, the species of Gram-positive, spore-forming, rod-like bacteria that causes tetanus

Background imageInfect Collection: Streptococcus mutans bacteria on tooth

Streptococcus mutans bacteria on tooth
Streptococcus mutans bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Streptococcus mutans bacteria adhering to the enamel of a tooth

Background imageInfect Collection: F / col TEM of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

F / col TEM of Mycobacterium tuberculosis
False-colour transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a rod-like bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis in humans

Background imageInfect Collection: Moraxella catarrhalis bacterium dividing

Moraxella catarrhalis bacterium dividing

Background imageInfect Collection: Mycobacterium tuber- culosis bacteria

Mycobacterium tuber- culosis bacteria
False-colour scanning electron micrograph, SEM, of the rodlike bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causative agent of tuberculosis in humans

Background imageInfect Collection: TEM of Proteus mirabilis bacterium

TEM of Proteus mirabilis bacterium

Background imageInfect Collection: Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria

Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a sect- ion through Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria

Background imageInfect Collection: Cell infected with HIV, SEM

Cell infected with HIV, SEM
Cell infected with HIV. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of HIV particles (yellow) budding from the membrane of a host cell (red)



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"Infect: Unseen Threats and Devastating Consequences" Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium: Revealing the microscopic world, this image captures the vibrant colors of a Salmonella bacterium, reminding us that danger can lurk where we least expect it. A map from On the Mode of Communication of Cholera, 1855 (litho): This historical map serves as a haunting reminder of how diseases like cholera can rapidly spread through communities, emphasizing the importance of understanding and preventing infections. The fourth plague of Egypt, from a book of Bible Pictures, c. 1250 (vellum): Depicting one of the biblical plagues sent to punish Pharaoh for his refusal to release the Israelites, this illustration showcases how infectious diseases have plagued humanity since ancient times. Common Ash dieback caused by Ash Dieback fungal disease: Witnessing nature's vulnerability to infection, this image portrays ash trees suffering from Chalara fraxinea fungus—a stark reminder that even our environment is not immune to devastating contagions. TEM of HIV (AIDS) viruses budding from a T-cell: Offering insight into one of modern medicine's greatest challenges, this electron micrograph highlights HIV/AIDS viruses emerging from T-cells—an ongoing battle against an insidious infection. Proteus mirabilis bacterium: Capturing the intricate details underpinning microbial lifeforms, this photograph showcases Proteus mirabilis bacteria—a constant reminder that unseen pathogens are ever-present in our surroundings. Chalara dieback sign in woodland with infected ash trees: Standing amidst an afflicted forest landscape ravaged by highly contagious fungal disease, Lower Wood Reserve reminds us that infections can devastate entire ecosystems if left unchecked. 8 & Dairy farming heifers with Ringworm infection.