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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Indigenous Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 908 pictures in our Indigenous collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


A Himba woman in traditional attire. Her body gleams from a mixture of red ochre Featured Print

A Himba woman in traditional attire. Her body gleams from a mixture of red ochre

A Himba woman in traditional attire. Her body gleams from a mixture of red ochre, butterfat and herbs. Her long hair is styled in the traditional Himba way and is crowned with a headdress made of lambskin, called erembe. Her large, round white-beaded necklace, called ombwari, is worn by both sexes. Leather garments continue to be worn. The Himba are Herero-speaking Bantu nomads who live in the harsh, dry but starkly beautiful landscape of remote northwest Namibia.

© Nigel Pavitt

South American cannibals, 16th century Featured Print

South American cannibals, 16th century

South American cannibals. 16th-century artwork of indigenous people of South American dismembering and roasting their slain enemies. Artwork from 'Cosmographie universelle' (1575) by the French explorer and writer Andre Thevet (1516-1590). This book described the history and geography of the lands in which Thevet had travelled. The two volumes and four tomes contain over 1000 pages divided into 23 books. This woodcut is from chapter XV of book XXI.

© MIDDLE TEMPLE LIBRARY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Maori head tattoos, artwork Featured Print

Maori head tattoos, artwork

Maori head tattoos. 19th century artwork of tattooed Maori heads. The Maoris, the indigenous population of the islands of New Zealand, are generally tattoed in curved or spiral lines that are concentrated on the face. The patterns of the tattooing are often personalised to the person being tattooed. Artwork from The Origin of Civilisation and the Primitive Condition of Man (Sir John Lubbock, 1870).

© SHEILA TERRY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY