sales@mediastorehouse.com
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Incident Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 428 pictures in our Incident collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Panjdeh incident - Russian encounter with Afghan forces at Pul-i-Khishty (Brick Bridge)

Panjdeh incident - Russian encounter with Afghan forces at Pul-i-Khishty (Brick Bridge) . The 'incident' of 1885 was a diplomatic crisis between the British Empire and the Russian Empire caused by Russian expansion south-eastwards towards the Emirate of Afghanistan and the British Raj (India). After nearly completing the Russian conquest of Central Asia (Russian Turkestan) Russian forces captured an Afghan border fort. Seeing a threat to India, Britain came close to threatening war but both sides backed down and the matter was settled by diplomacy. The effect was to stop further Russian expansion in Asia, except for the Pamir Mountains and to define the north-western border of Afghanistan. Date: 1885

© Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

Auckland's advance from its battalion headquarters

This drawing relates to an incident on the 14th/15th September 1916 and is described in a book entitled 'A Saga of the Sword' by Austin F. Britten, published by Arrowsmith, London 1928. The chapter, entitled 'The End of an Epoch', contains the following map reference : S11 b4.9. This is right in the middle of the area of the 2nd Battalion Auckland Regiment which was in No-Man's Land, just a shade short by 50 yards or so of the German Front Line in Coffee Lane. And, no doubt, Matania is attempting to portray an incident in the initial phase of the Auckland's advance from its battalion headquarters, slightly on the right of the fork (La Forche) which is where the New Zealand memorial now stands. It would also appear that four tanks were allocated to the New Zealand Division and all four passed this way towards the fork before spreading out. They were from D Company and were numbered D8, D10, D11 and D12. The actual image was never used in the book (which in the end did not have any illustrations) but no doubt Matania was asked by Austin Britten to produce this incident at the above map reference. The name of the book was written on the back of the picture. Fortunino Matania, Ri (1881-1963). One of the most accomplished realistic illustrators and artists of his time, his wartime work was immensely popular and appeared in nearly every major news magazine, Allied, Neutral and Central Powers alike. Date: 1916

© David Cohen Fine Art/Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

Camel train at Cannakale, Turkey - Chanak Crisis

A camel train at Cannakale returned from provisioning the front line during the Chanak Crisis (Chanak Affair, Chanak Incident) - a war scare in September 1922 between Britain and Republic of Turkey. The incident was caused by Turkish efforts to push Greek forces out of Turkey to restore Turkish rule in the Allied occupied territories of Turkey. Turkish troops marched against British and French positions in the Dardanelles neutral zone, but the crisis quickly ended when Turkey, having overwhelmed the Greeks, agreed to a negotiated settlement that gave it the territory it wanted. There was no war. Due to his perceived mishandling of the crisis the incident led to the downfall of Prime Minister David Lloyd George. Date: 1922

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection