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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
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Humorous Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 933 pictures in our Humorous collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Smoking club, 18th century artwork Featured Print

Smoking club, 18th century artwork

Smoking club, 18th century artwork. The practice of smoking tobacco was popularised in England and Ireland in the 1580s and 1590s by the English soldier and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (c.1552-1618). This artwork, by the English caricaturist James Gillray (1757-1815), shows members of the House of Commons puffing smoke at each other. Those present include the Speaker (left) Charles James Fox (1749-1806), the Prime Minister (second from left) William Pitt the Younger (1759-1806) and the Home Secretary (second from right) Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville (1742-1811). This copy of this artwork was published in the work 'Tobacco, its History and Associations' (1859) by the English engraver Frederick William Fairholt (1814-1866).

© GEORGE ARENTS COLLECTION/NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY/ SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Mr. Morris reading poems to Mr. Burne Jones (pen & ink on paper) Featured Print

Mr. Morris reading poems to Mr. Burne Jones (pen & ink on paper)

XJF416518 Mr. Morris reading poems to Mr. Burne Jones (pen & ink on paper) by Burne-Jones, Edward Coley (1833-98); Private Collection; (add.info.: William Morris (1834-98) English designer and poet; Morris is shown behind a desk reading out his poems as Burne-Jones sits dozing on a chair;); English, out of copyright

© Copyright: www.bridgemanimages.com

(The Morning After of a Faun) 'Le Lendemain d'un Faune' (or Featured Print

(The Morning After of a Faun) 'Le Lendemain d'un Faune' (or

(The Morning After of a Faun) 'Le Lendemain d'un Faune' (or, 'What an Afternoon') - The Great success of the new ballet 'L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune' in which the faun, failing to abduct the nymph herself, has to be content with her wrap, has suggested a sequel - wherein M. Nijinsky is made to account for his theft in the usual way. The Policeman is calling on a bad line (to his Chief) who can't quite understand whether he is saying 'Faune' or 'Phone' !!! Date: 1913

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans