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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Hanging Scroll Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 330 pictures in our Hanging Scroll collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Tiger Family, 1800s. Creator: Unknown

Tiger Family, 1800s. The Korean tiger was beloved as a deity of the cardinal directions as early as the mural paintings in the Goguryeo Tombs (37 BC-AD 668), and was associated with the east. The tiger was later the motif on embroidered insignia for military court officials in the Joseon period. Gradually, the tiger gained popularity in folk paintings as a protector to drive away evil spirits. It was also thought to be a messenger of sansin , the mountain spirit in Korean shamanism. Leopards were mistakenly thought to be baby tigers, and were often painted with the mother tiger, as in this painting.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Featured Print

The Sand-Carrying Festival (Sunamochi Matsuri), 1856. Creator: Sakai Basai (Japanese

The Sand-Carrying Festival (Sunamochi Matsuri), 1856. Dredging waterways to preserve their function once required the cooperation of large numbers of people, seen at the top of this painting. Sand-carrying festivals were historically associated with religious rites or gathering alms to construct places of worship, and involved not only the labor of collecting sand from rivers but also parades and performances marking the event. Kyoto's Kamo River has been dredged many times over the centuries, including in 1856, the year this image was made. Although the title at the upper right says Taihei Kakan, or "Peaceful, Beautiful View," the painter's delightful scene reminds his audience that at the best of times, peace may have little to do with quiet. Sakai Baisai was a student of literati painter Yamamoto Baiitsu (1783-1856). He was active until around 1879, when he relocated to Kobe to make his living as a design painter on porcelains destined for export.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

Featured Print

Shotoku Taishi and His Sons, 1300s. Creator: Unknown

Shotoku Taishi and His Sons, 1300s. Shotoku Taishi (about 574-622), prince regent, was attributed with numerous acts of faith in his lifetime, actions often related to the transmission of Buddhism to Japan. The many tales of Prince Shotoku's religiosity make it difficult to confirm the scene being depicted here. This might show a moment when Prince Shotoku, aged 16, dropped to his knees in prayer during a battle between his clan, the Soga, and another clan. This might also relate to another time in Shotoku's life when, again at the age of 16, Shotoku prayed day and night, dressed in full court attire and holding a longhandled incense burner, for the recovery of his sick father Emperor Youmei (reigned 585-87). At his miraculous recovery, the emperor converted to Buddhism.

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images