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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Ghanaian Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 159 pictures in our Ghanaian collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Fulani village, Ghana, Gold Coast, West Africa Featured Print

Fulani village, Ghana, Gold Coast, West Africa

Fulani village, part of Cape Coast, Ghana, Gold Coast, West Africa. The Fulani, described here as desert tribes from the Sahara, imported their own style of building. Date: circa 1924

© Mary Evans / Pharcide

1920s, 1924, 20s, Africa, African, Building, Buildings, Cape, Coast, Ethnic, Fulani, Ghana, Ghanaian, Gold, Hill, Hills, Tribe, Tribes, Twenties, Village, West

Politicians, Accra, Ghana, Gold Coast, West Africa Featured Print

Politicians, Accra, Ghana, Gold Coast, West Africa

Group photo of politicians (members of the Gold Coast Cabinet), Accra, Ghana, Gold Coast, West Africa, photographed on 17 July 1956, the date of the legislative election which brought Kwame Nkrumah's Convention People's Party to power. Date: 1956

© Mary Evans / Pharcide

1950s, 50s, Accra, Africa, African, Building, Buildings, Cabinet, Capital, Clothes, Clothing, Coast, Costume, Dress, Election, Fifties, Ghana, Ghanaian, Gold, Group, July, Legislative, Members, Native, Pattern, Patterned, Politicians, Politics, Traditional, West

The Asante Aya Kese, or great brass basin Featured Print

The Asante Aya Kese, or great brass basin

The Asante Aya Kese, or great brass basin, a Ghanaian ceremonial bowl, which originally stood outside the royal mausoleum at Bantama, 1817 (c)-1896 (c). Around the rim the sides flatten out forming a lip with baluster knops and on either side are a pair of crouching lions, facing each other with mouth open. Inside of the bowl is chased all round with lines of grooves from the maker's hammer. Brought from Kumasi, West Africa, during the 3rd Ashanti War, 1896 (c). The bowl was first described by Bowditch in 1817 as being used to collect the blood of beheaded sacrificial victims by the Kings of Ashanti. Rattray (p113) says however that this is incorrect. Date: 1817 (circa)

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library