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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Frog Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 948 pictures in our Frog collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


David Attenborough, British naturalist Featured Print

David Attenborough, British naturalist

David Attenborough. Caricature of the British naturalist and broadcaster Sir David Frederick Attenborough (born 1926) holding a frog. Attenborough is most famous for the numerous BBC television nature documentaries he has presented. In the 1960s and 1970s he was controller of BBC Two and director of programming for BBC Television. His awards include Commander of the Order of the British Empire (1974), Fellow of the Royal Society (1983), Knight Bachelor (1985), Commander of the Royal Victorian Order (1991), Companion of Honour (1996) and the Order of Merit (2005)

© GARY BROWN/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

X-ray of a frog Featured Print

X-ray of a frog

Frog. X-ray of a frog (family Ranidae). The frog's semi-circular jawbone gives it a wide gape for capturing prey with its tongue. The strong limb bones are adapted for powerful jumping and swimming. The forelimbs are attached to a fused shoulder girdle to take the impact of landing after a jump. The three pelvic bones are also fused, providing a fixed pivot from which the long hindlegs can kick. The rear toes are elongated and webbed to assist with swimming

© D. ROBERTS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Xenopus frog, X-ray Featured Print

Xenopus frog, X-ray

Xenopus laevis frog, coloured X-ray. This frog is widely used in biology as a model organism, as its egg cells are large and easy to manipulate in the laboratory. It is also popular in the pet trade, where it is usually known by its common name, the African clawed frog. It is almost exclusively aquatic, using its powerful back legs for swimming and burying itself in the mud, rather than for jumping like terrestrial frogs

© Michel Delarue, Ism/Science Photo Library