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Dickens Collection

"Dickens: A Tale of Literary Brilliance and Enduring Legacy" Charles Dickens, the renowned English novelist

Background imageDickens Collection: CHARLES DICKENS (1812-1870). English novelist. Dickens Dream

CHARLES DICKENS (1812-1870). English novelist. Dickens Dream. Unfinished oil painting by Robert William Buss, 1870s

Background imageDickens Collection: Dickens / Empty Chair

Dickens / Empty Chair
HIS HOME AT GADSHILL His desk and empty chair after his death, dated 9 June 1870

Background imageDickens Collection: Oliver Twist meeting the Artful dodger

Oliver Twist meeting the Artful dodger in the streets Date: First published: 1836-37

Background imageDickens Collection: Dickens Dream, 1875. Creator: Buss, Robert William (1804-1875)

Dickens Dream, 1875. Creator: Buss, Robert William (1804-1875)
Dickens Dream, 1875. Found in the collection of Charles Dickens Museum, London

Background imageDickens Collection: DICKENS: A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim. Illustration by Harold Cropping from a 1920

DICKENS: A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim. Illustration by Harold Cropping from a 1920 edition of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol

Background imageDickens Collection: In the Days of Dickens by Cecil Aldin

In the Days of Dickens by Cecil Aldin
A coach and horses laden with jovial travellers looking very much like the Pickwick Club drive into a village to stop by a handsome looking coaching inn

Background imageDickens Collection: Folly Ditch, Jacobs Island, (c1878). Creator: Unknown

Folly Ditch, Jacobs Island, (c1878). Creator: Unknown
Folly Ditch, Jacobs Island, (c1878). Jacobs Island, a notorious slum on the south bank of the River Thames in Bermondsey, London, was made famous in Charles Dickenss novel Oliver Twist

Background imageDickens Collection: Bill Sykes (Barnard)

Bill Sykes (Barnard)
Bill Sykes sits at a table with a bottle of booze while his dog Bullseye cowers against the wall, afraid of being hit

Background imageDickens Collection: Dickens & his Creations

Dickens & his Creations
Charles Dickens Writer

Background imageDickens Collection: Scrooge Sees Marley Face

Scrooge Sees Marley Face
Scrooge is startled to see Marleys face on his door, instead of the knocker

Background imageDickens Collection: Scrooge and Marley Ghost

Scrooge and Marley Ghost
Scrooge receives a visit from the ghost of Jacob Marley, his former business partner

Background imageDickens Collection: Dickensian Party

Dickensian Party
Mrs Fezziwigs Ball - shown to Scrooge by the Ghost of Christmas Past

Background imageDickens Collection: Bob Cratchit & Tiny Tim

Bob Cratchit & Tiny Tim
Happy at the prospect of a hearty Christmas dinner, due to the generosity of the reformed Ebenezer Scrooge, Bob Cratchit carries his son Tiny Tim on his shoulder!

Background imageDickens Collection: Charles Dickens / Bibby s

Charles Dickens / Bibby s
Charles Dickens Writer

Background imageDickens Collection: Oliver Twist / Title Page

Oliver Twist / Title Page
Title page

Background imageDickens Collection: Dickens / Christmas Carol

Dickens / Christmas Carol
Scrooge receives a visit from the ghost of Jacob Marley, his former business partner

Background imageDickens Collection: Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
CHARLES DICKENS English writer, at his writing desk, circa 1860

Background imageDickens Collection: Charles Dickens in his study at Gadshill

Charles Dickens in his study at Gadshill. Charles Dickens, full-length portrait, seated at desk, facing left, in his study at Gads Hill Place. Date c1875

Background imageDickens Collection: A posthumous portrait of Dickens and his characters; Dickenss Dream, 1875 (oil on canvas)

A posthumous portrait of Dickens and his characters; Dickenss Dream, 1875 (oil on canvas)
3071349 A posthumous portrait of Dickens and his characters; Dickenss Dream, 1875 (oil on canvas) by Buss, Robert William (1804-75); 70x89 cm; Charles Dickens Museum, London

Background imageDickens Collection: Scene from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, 1843. Artist: John Leech

Scene from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, 1843. Artist: John Leech
Scene from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, 1843. The irascible, curmudgeonly Ebenezer Scrooge, sitting alone on Christmas Eve, is visited by the ghost of Marley, his late business partner

Background imageDickens Collection: Old Curiosity Shop

Old Curiosity Shop
THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP A view of the original shop on Portsmouth Street, London, immortalised by Charles Dickens in his novel of the same name

Background imageDickens Collection: Cover design, The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens

Cover design, The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens
Cover design for the first instalment of The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, by Charles Dickens. 1836

Background imageDickens Collection: Mr Micawber makes Punch - David Copperfield, Charles Dickens

Mr Micawber makes Punch - David Copperfield, Charles Dickens Date: circa 1910s

Background imageDickens Collection: DICKENS: DAVID COPPERFIELD. A happy family scene at the Micawbers: engraving, 19th century

DICKENS: DAVID COPPERFIELD. A happy family scene at the Micawbers: engraving, 19th century, for Charles Dickens " David Copperfield."

Background imageDickens Collection: GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Wood engraving from a 19th-century American edition of Charles Dickens Great

GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Wood engraving from a 19th-century American edition of Charles Dickens Great Expectations

Background imageDickens Collection: DICKENS: A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Marleys Ghost appears to Scrooge

DICKENS: A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Marleys Ghost appears to Scrooge: illustration by Arthur Rackham for Charles Dickens A
DICKENS: A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Marleys Ghost appears to Scrooge: illustration by Arthur Rackham for Charles Dickens " A Christmas Carol."

Background imageDickens Collection: Bayham Street, Camden, London (Dickens)

Bayham Street, Camden, London (Dickens)
16 (now 161) Bayham Street, Camden, London - home to John Dickens and his family, who moved here from Chatham in 1823. Also the residence of Mr Micawber

Background imageDickens Collection: Mr Bumble with Oliver

Mr Bumble with Oliver
Stern Mr. Bumble holds the hand of apprehensive young Oliver Twist, as they walk away from the workhouse

Background imageDickens Collection: Pip & Miss Havisham

Pip & Miss Havisham
Pip and Miss Havisham

Background imageDickens Collection: I Make Myself Known to My Aunt. Etching from David Copperfield, c1840-1880, (1923)

I Make Myself Known to My Aunt. Etching from David Copperfield, c1840-1880, (1923). Artist: Hablot Knight Browne
I Make Myself Known to My Aunt. Etching from David Copperfield, 1840-1880, (1923). David Copperfield is the eighth novel by Charles Dickens

Background imageDickens Collection: Mr Fezziwigs Ball, illustration by John Leech for A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens( London)

Mr Fezziwigs Ball, illustration by John Leech for A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens( London)
Mr Fezziwigs Ball, illustration by John Leech for A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens( London, 1843). This novella was the earliest and most popular of Dickens Christmas stories

Background imageDickens Collection: Poster advertising David Copperfield, French edition

Poster advertising David Copperfield, French edition
Poster advertising a French translation of David Copperfield by Charles Dickens. David is depicted in Mr Brownlows garden

Background imageDickens Collection: Captain Collins of Brighton, with his family

Captain Collins of Brighton, with his family
Captain Fred Collins of Brighton, who ran three pleasure boats called the Skylark and was a familiar figure on Brighton Beach for sixty years

Background imageDickens Collection: Charles Dickens, by Andre Gill, 1868

Charles Dickens, by Andre Gill, 1868
Engraved caricature of Charles Dickens (1812-1870), the English writer, produced by the French artist, Andre Gill, first published in 1868

Background imageDickens Collection: Scrooge at his Desk

Scrooge at his Desk
Old Scrooge sat busy in his counting house

Background imageDickens Collection: Scrooge Sees Grave

Scrooge Sees Grave
The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come shows Scrooge his gravestone

Background imageDickens Collection: Gads Hill House

Gads Hill House
The fine red brick house at Gads Hill, near Rochester, Kent. It was here that Charles Dickens died on 9 June 1870, while writing his novel " Edwin Drood"

Background imageDickens Collection: Bleak House

Bleak House, Broadstairs, Kent, England. This building has great literary associations, for it was here that Charles Dickens lived and wrote " David Copperfield" etc

Background imageDickens Collection: Dickens Cartoon 1867

Dickens Cartoon 1867
CHARLES DICKENS " Au Revoir" - Dickens is bidden farewell to by some of the characters from his novels

Background imageDickens Collection: Dickens / Christmas Carol

Dickens / Christmas Carol
Mr Fezziwig invites Mrs Fezziwig to dance Date: First published: 1843-44

Background imageDickens Collection: Dickens / D. Copperfield

Dickens / D. Copperfield
David arrives at the home of his aunt, Betsy Trotwood

Background imageDickens Collection: Mr Pickwick Addresses

Mr Pickwick Addresses
Mr Pickwick addresses the Club

Background imageDickens Collection: Astleys Amphitheatre

Astleys Amphitheatre
Philip Astleys amphitheatre, Westminster Bridge Road, London : loved by Dickens, this was also the scene of clowns such as Grimaldi, and popular melodrama

Background imageDickens Collection: The Morning

The Morning Lady Dedlock is found dead by the gates of the cemetery in which Captain Hawdon lies buried

Background imageDickens Collection: Pickwick / Samuel Weller

Pickwick / Samuel Weller
The first appearance of Mr Samuel Weller

Background imageDickens Collection: Mr Pickwick Raises Toast

Mr Pickwick Raises Toast
Mr Pickwick raises a toast

Background imageDickens Collection: Dickens / Christmas Carol

Dickens / Christmas Carol
Bob Cratchit with Tiny Tim, his crippled youngest son

Background imageDickens Collection: Dickens / Haunted / Fp

Dickens / Haunted / Fp
THE HAUNTED MAN the unhappy haunted man of the title gazes into the fire, while his own ghost lurks behind him



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"Dickens: A Tale of Literary Brilliance and Enduring Legacy" Charles Dickens, the renowned English novelist, left an indelible mark on literature with his captivating storytelling. In the 1870s, artist Robert William Buss attempted to capture the essence of "Dickens Dream" in an unfinished oil painting. This artwork serves as a testament to Dickens' imaginative genius that continues to inspire readers even today. Another poignant image associated with the iconic "Empty Chair. " Symbolizing his absence after his passing in 1870, this chair represents a void left behind by a literary giant whose words still resonate across generations. One cannot discuss Charles Dickens without mentioning some of his unforgettable characters. From Oliver Twist meeting the mischievous Artful Dodger to Bill Sykes portrayed chillingly by Barnard, these figures have become ingrained in our cultural consciousness. A notable work that showcases both Dickens' social commentary and heartwarming themes is "A Christmas Carol. " Illustrated by Harold Cropping in a 1920 edition, it depicts Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim embodying compassion and redemption amidst Victorian London's harsh realities. Exploring darker corners of society was also characteristic of Dickens' writing. The mysterious Folly Ditch at Jacobs Island provides insight into the author's fascination with hidden worlds and societal injustices prevalent during his time. In addition to immortalizing memorable characters and settings, Charles Dickens himself became synonymous with his creations. His influence extended beyond literature; he became an icon representing resilience against adversity and championing social reform. Even today, we can witness how deeply embedded Dickens remains within popular culture. Whether through Bibby's depiction or Cecil Aldin's evocative illustrations in "In the Days of Dickens, " these artistic interpretations continue to bring life to his timeless stories. Finally, one cannot forget Scrooge's transformative encounter when he sees Marley's ghostly face—a pivotal moment illustrating redemption and the power of self-reflection.