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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Culture Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 791 pictures in our Culture collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Cervantess Don Quixote in his library Featured Print

Cervantess Don Quixote in his library

Cervantes's Don Quixote in his library, 1863 French edition. Don Quixote reading books on chivalry in his library before setting out on his quest. Don Quixote is a work published in two parts (1605 and 1615) by Spanish novelist Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616). It tells the story of a Spanish nobleman and would-be knight Alonso Quijano (who calls himself Don Quixote) and the farmer Sancho who travels with him as his squire. Artwork, by French artist Gustave Dore (1832-1883; engraved by Heliodore Joseph Pisan (1822-1890)

© MIDDLE TEMPLE LIBRARY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

The Lectern - Talerstolen - at Skamlingsbanken, Denmark Featured Print

The Lectern - Talerstolen - at Skamlingsbanken, Denmark

The Lectern (Talerstolen) at Skamlingsbanken, a large hill located in Vejstrup Parish, Jutland, Denmark, between Kolding and Christiansfeld. Erected in 1903 and designed by Lorenz Frolich and made by Niels Larsen Stevns, the monument tells (with national, Christian and Nordic symbols) the struggle for the mother tongue. Several major historic public meetings took place here during and after the disputes over the territory of Schleswig-Holstein. When peace returned, there was an exchange of territories between the kingdom and the Duchy of Southern Jutland. As a result, eight non-Jutland parishes in the northern part of Tyrstrup Herred, including Vejstrup Parish, were transferred to the kingdom and Skamlingsbanken thereafter fell within the borders of Denmark.
circa 1910s

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection

Pottery Bottle, Peru, South America Featured Print

Pottery Bottle, Peru, South America

This bottle is likely to have been made by the Chimú people, who lived in northern Peru. It dates from AD1100-1300 and depicts a human-like figure holding a monkey. Much Chimúan pottery incorporates representations of human-like characters and animals, usually monkeys or seabirds, into their design. The geometric patterns on the pot are thought to represent waves, representing the culture's relationship with the sea and maritime excursions. The consistency of the shapes and decorations are often achieved via the mass production technique of press moulding'. The Chimú are best known for making black pottery, which is thought to have been accomplished by reducing oxygen levels during the clay firing process. Before firing the clay, they would often burnish the vessel in order to give it a unique silver sheen; it is because of this that Chimúan pottery was very rarely painted. The majority of Peruvian pottery is black in colour, characterised by a distinctive metallic look. The bottle is 21.0 cm high and 15.0 cm wide. TRURI : 1927.49

© RIC, photographer Mike Searle