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Constellation Collection

Gazing up at the night sky, we are reminded of the vastness and beauty of the universe

Background imageConstellation Collection: The Plough asterism in Ursa Major

The Plough asterism in Ursa Major
The Plough. This asterism (group of stars) is part of the much larger constellation Ursa Major, most of which is out of frame

Background imageConstellation Collection: Orion nebula

Orion nebula. Coloured composite infrared and visible light image of the Orion nebula M42. This emission nebula, a cloud of gas and dust in which starbirth takes place

Background imageConstellation Collection: Orions belt

Orions belt. Optical image of the line of three bright stars making up the belt in the constellation of Orion. The stars are, from lower left to upper right: Alnitak (Zeta Orionis)

Background imageConstellation Collection: Southern Cross (Kranz)

Southern Cross (Kranz)
The southern sky with the SOUTHERN CROSS constellation

Background imageConstellation Collection: A galactic light show in spiral galaxy NGC 4258

A galactic light show in spiral galaxy NGC 4258, also known as M106, about 23 million light years away. This galaxy is famous, however

Background imageConstellation Collection: Cygnus and Lyra constellations

Cygnus and Lyra constellations. Cygnus, the swan, is at centre left, with Lyra, the lyre, at centre right. The brightest star is Cygnus is Deneb (Alpha Cygni, upper left)

Background imageConstellation Collection: Optical photo of the star Sirius using star filter

Optical photo of the star Sirius using star filter
The two bright stars just below centre are Alpha Centauri (left) & Beta Centauri. To their right are the four stars forming the constellation of the Southern Cross, or Crux Australis

Background imageConstellation Collection: Scorpius constellation

Scorpius constellation. This is a large zodiacal constellation in the southern hemisphere that is visible in summer. The Sun passes though it in late November

Background imageConstellation Collection: ZODIAC: TAURUS. Fresco, 1575, from Villa Farnese, Caprarola, Italy

ZODIAC: TAURUS. Fresco, 1575, from Villa Farnese, Caprarola, Italy

Background imageConstellation Collection: The Orion Nebula

The Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated south of Orions Belt. It is one of the brightest nebulae, visible to the naked eye in the night sky

Background imageConstellation Collection: M16, The Eagle Nebula in Serpens

M16, The Eagle Nebula in Serpens

Background imageConstellation Collection: The majestic Sombrero Galaxy (Messier 104)

The majestic Sombrero Galaxy (Messier 104)

Background imageConstellation Collection: CONSTELLATION MAP. An Indian Sanskrit star map, 1840, ordered as a manuscript horoscope for Prince

CONSTELLATION MAP. An Indian Sanskrit star map, 1840, ordered as a manuscript horoscope for Prince Navanihal Singh

Background imageConstellation Collection: Orion constellation

Orion constellation. The most prominent feature of the constellation is Orions Belt, a row of three bright stars (centre left)

Background imageConstellation Collection: Astronomy, Cloud, Constellation, Exploration, Galaxy, Illuminated, Light, Nebula

Astronomy, Cloud, Constellation, Exploration, Galaxy, Illuminated, Light, Nebula
Astronomy, Cloud, Constellation, Exploration, Galaxy, Illuminated, Lig, 78364142

Background imageConstellation Collection: CELLARIUS, Andreas (1596-1665). Atlas Coelestis

CELLARIUS, Andreas (1596-1665). Atlas Coelestis seu Harmonia Macrocosmica. 1661. Fol 24. Hemisphaerium stellatum boreale antiquum. Representation of the Northern Hemisphere

Background imageConstellation Collection: Durers Celestial Globe, 1515

Durers Celestial Globe, 1515. This shows the northern hemisphere, and was prepared in conjunction with the astronomer Stabius

Background imageConstellation Collection: The Constellations (Plate XXI) Capricorn and Aquarius, from A Celestial Atlas by Alexander Jamieson

The Constellations (Plate XXI) Capricorn and Aquarius, from A Celestial Atlas by Alexander Jamieson, pub. London 1822 (hand coloured engraving). Tenth and eleventh Sign of the Zodiac

Background imageConstellation Collection: Aurora borealis and Milky Way above Fish Lake, Yukon, Canada

Aurora borealis and Milky Way above Fish Lake, Yukon, Canada
Aurora borealis and Milky Way above Fish Lake, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada

Background imageConstellation Collection: Hubble Space Telescope image of gaseous pillars

Hubble Space Telescope image of gaseous pillars

Background imageConstellation Collection: Milky Way over the Sea

Milky Way over the Sea
Reprocessed

Background imageConstellation Collection: Scorpius constellation

Scorpius constellation. Scorpius, the scorpion, is a zodiacal constellation crossed by the Milky Way. It is best seen in summer in the northern hemisphere

Background imageConstellation Collection: Optical photo of the star Sirius using star filter

Optical photo of the star Sirius using star filter
The two bright stars just below centre are Alpha Centauri (left) & Beta Centauri. To their right are the four stars forming the constellation of the Southern Cross, or Crux Australis

Background imageConstellation Collection: Interacting galaxies NGC 5257 and 5258

Interacting galaxies NGC 5257 and 5258
Interacting galaxies NGC 5257 and NGC 5258. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of two interacting spiral galaxies, collectively known as Arp 240

Background imageConstellation Collection: Northern hemisphere star chart, 1537

Northern hemisphere star chart, 1537
Northern hemisphere star chart, 16th century. Star chart (planisphere) of the northern hemisphere, based on Albrecht Durers star charts of 1515. The illustrations show the constellations

Background imageConstellation Collection: Perseus constellation

Perseus constellation. Illustrated card from a 19th century astronomical teaching aid called Uranias Mirror, after the Greek muse of astronomy. There are 32 cards in total

Background imageConstellation Collection: An asteroid belt around the bright star Vega

An asteroid belt around the bright star Vega
This artists concept illustrates an asteroid belt around the bright star Vega

Background imageConstellation Collection: Constellation map. On the left side, the northern

Constellation map. On the left side, the northern
" Constellation map. On the left side, the northern constellations and on the right side, the southern constellations

Background imageConstellation Collection: Cygnus and Lyra constellations

Cygnus and Lyra constellations. Illustrated card from a 19th century astronomical teaching aid called Uranias Mirror, after the Greek muse of astronomy. There are 32 cards in total

Background imageConstellation Collection: Blunt / Cygnus & Lyra / Pl32

Blunt / Cygnus & Lyra / Pl32
The constellation of Cygnus - a flying swan - and Lyra - that of an ancient Greek lyre

Background imageConstellation Collection: Celestial map by Johannes Van Keulen (1654-1715)

Celestial map by Johannes Van Keulen (1654-1715). SPAIN. Barcelona. Barcelona Maritime Museum

Background imageConstellation Collection: Cygnus constellation

Cygnus constellation. Cygnus, the swan, is a summer constellation in the northern hemisphere, although it is far north enough to be at least partly seen year-round from many northern parts

Background imageConstellation Collection: Christmas star as planetary conjunction

Christmas star as planetary conjunction. Artwork of a possible Christmas Star in the night sky of the year 7 BC. Traces of the planetary conjunction of Jupiter

Background imageConstellation Collection: Ursa Major constellation, Bode Star Atlas

Ursa Major constellation, Bode Star Atlas
Ursa Major constellation. This star map shows the northern hemisphere constellation of Ursa Major (the Great Bear) as published by the German astronomer Johann Elert Bode (1747-1826) in 1805

Background imageConstellation Collection: Hydra Star Map

Hydra Star Map
Hydra constellation, including an owl, a raven and a sextant

Background imageConstellation Collection: Ursa Minor Star Map

Ursa Minor Star Map
Draco and Ursa Minor constellation

Background imageConstellation Collection: Canis Major Star Map

Canis Major Star Map
Canis Major (dog) and Lepus (hare) constellation

Background imageConstellation Collection: Orion (Kranz)

Orion (Kranz)
A star-filled sky, featuring the constellation of Orion

Background imageConstellation Collection: Gemini

Gemini
The Constellation Gemini

Background imageConstellation Collection: Sagittarius

Sagittarius
The Constellation Sagittarius

Background imageConstellation Collection: Ursa Major Star Map

Ursa Major Star Map
The constellation of Ursa Major

Background imageConstellation Collection: Optical photo of the star Sirius using star filter

Optical photo of the star Sirius using star filter
Gemini constellation. Stars of Castor (at centre) and Pollux (at lower centre) in the constellation of Gemini (the Twins)

Background imageConstellation Collection: Blunt / Pisces / Plate 49

Blunt / Pisces / Plate 49
The constellation of Pisces, the fish

Background imageConstellation Collection: The Arrow Star Map

The Arrow Star Map
The Arrow constellation, showing Antinous being attacked by an eagle and also including a dolphin

Background imageConstellation Collection: Pegasus Star Map

Pegasus Star Map
The Pegasus and Equuleus constellation

Background imageConstellation Collection: Taurus

Taurus
The Constellation Taurus

Background imageConstellation Collection: Cometary Knots Around A Dying Star

Cometary Knots Around A Dying Star
These gigantic, tadpole-shaped objects are probably the result of a dying stars last gasps. Dubbed " cometary knots" because their glowing heads and gossamer tails resemble comets

Background imageConstellation Collection: Observation of whirlpool galaxy in Canes Venatici, from Observations of Nebulae

Observation of whirlpool galaxy in Canes Venatici, from Observations of Nebulae
539912 Observation of whirlpool galaxy in Canes Venatici, from Observations of Nebulae, by Lord Rosse, published in London, 1850 (engraving) by English School



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Gazing up at the night sky, we are reminded of the vastness and beauty of the universe. Amongst the countless stars that twinkle above us, constellations stand out as celestial works of art. One such the Plough asterism in Ursa Major, also known as the Big Dipper. Its distinctive shape has guided travelers for centuries, serving as a navigational tool across land and sea. Orion's Belt is another prominent feature in our night sky. This trio of stars forms part of Orion, one of the most recognizable constellations worldwide. Just below it lies the breathtaking Orion Nebula, a stellar nursery where new stars are born. In 1957, amidst this cosmic backdrop, Lockheed 1049G Super Constellation TWA soared over New York City. A marvel of aviation engineering at its time, this aircraft symbolized human ingenuity reaching for the skies. Venturing southward brings us to Crux or Southern Cross (Kranz), a constellation visible from southern latitudes that holds cultural significance for many civilizations throughout history. Cygnus and Lyra constellations grace our nights with their ethereal presence. Cygnus represents a graceful swan gliding through space while Lyra depicts an ancient musical instrument - both captivating observers with their enchanting allure. Stepping into history reveals a glimpse into the cockpit and crew quarters of a Lockheed Constellation aircraft - pioneers who fearlessly explored uncharted territories high above Earth's surface. The mighty hunter Orion dominates our imagination with his belt and sword shining brightly against an ink-black canvas. Legends tell tales of his bravery and strength immortalized among these glittering stars. Captured through an optical lens adorned with star filters, Sirius sparkles like no other star in sight – illuminating our path on even the darkest nights. Scorpius scuttles across our celestial stage.