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Common Market Collection

The Common Market, also known as the UK European Communities Membership Referendum of 1975, sparked passionate debates and divided opinions across the nation

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Home Secretary Roy Jenkins speaks during a debate on the Common Market

Home Secretary Roy Jenkins speaks during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Beverly Pilkington, 22 year old model from Essex, wearing Pro Europe white tee shirt with

Beverly Pilkington, 22 year old model from Essex, wearing Pro Europe white tee shirt with the slogan, Europe or bust? 19th May 1975

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Siv Hederby, 20 year old model from Sweden, voices here approval by wearing Pro Europe

Siv Hederby, 20 year old model from Sweden, voices here approval by wearing Pro Europe Common Market bikini, which incorporates the flags of all nine Market members

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Anti Common Market newsagent, Redcar. 1971

Anti Common Market newsagent, Redcar. 1971

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Speakers corner at St Peters Square in Central Manchester. 15th April 1977

Speakers corner at St Peters Square in Central Manchester. 15th April 1977

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Pro Europe Women wearing traditional costumes ahead of referendum, pictured in Solihull

Pro Europe Women wearing traditional costumes ahead of referendum, pictured in Solihull, West Midlands, England, 31st May 1975

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Common Market campaign in Middlesbrough Town Centre. 1971

Common Market campaign in Middlesbrough Town Centre. 1971

Background imageCommon Market Collection: The Golden Egg - Or the goose that lost its quack. Arthur Wragg cartoon for

The Golden Egg - Or the goose that lost its quack. Arthur Wragg cartoon for the Sunday Mirror following Prime Minister Harold annoucement (31st July 1961)

Background imageCommon Market Collection: UK European Communities Membership Referendum, 1975, also known as the Common Market

UK European Communities Membership Referendum, 1975, also known as the Common Market referendum, was held on 5th June 1975

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Labour politician and Secretary of State for Employment Michael Foot watched by Tony Benn

Labour politician and Secretary of State for Employment Michael Foot watched by Tony Benn, speaks during a debate on the Common Market

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Labour politician Anthony Wedgewood Benn during a debate on the Common Market

Labour politician Anthony Wedgewood Benn during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Labour politician Michael Foot talks to Barbara Castle during a debate on the Common

Labour politician Michael Foot talks to Barbara Castle during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Labour politician Clive Jenkins speaks during a debate on the Common Market

Labour politician Clive Jenkins speaks during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Politicians cast their votes during a debate on the Common Market

Politicians cast their votes during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Prime mInister Harold Wilson speaking during a debate on the Common Market

Prime mInister Harold Wilson speaking during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Prime mInister Harold Wilson talks to Barbara Castle during a debate on the Common Market

Prime mInister Harold Wilson talks to Barbara Castle during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Prime mInister Harold Wilson talks to cabinet members during a debate on the Common

Prime mInister Harold Wilson talks to cabinet members during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Home Secretary Roy Jenkins speaks during a debate on the Common Market

Home Secretary Roy Jenkins speaks during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Labour politician Barbara Castle during a debate on the Common Market

Labour politician Barbara Castle during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Prime mInister Harold Wilson during a debate on the Common Market

Prime mInister Harold Wilson during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Politics: Common: Market: Harold Wilson P. M. Labour Conference

Politics: Common: Market: Harold Wilson P. M. Labour Conference
Politics: Common: Market: Harold Wilson P.M. Labour Conference. Debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Labour politician James Callaghan speaks during a debate on the Common Market

Labour politician James Callaghan speaks during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Michael Foot during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will

Michael Foot during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Prime mInister Harold Wilson speaks during a debate on the Common Market

Prime mInister Harold Wilson speaks during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Prime mInister Harold Wilson during a debate on the Common Market

Prime mInister Harold Wilson during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Labour politician James Callaghan during a debate on the Common Market

Labour politician James Callaghan during a debate on the Common Market. Staying inside the Common Market will be best for Britain, Europe and the world

Background imageCommon Market Collection: Antique Map of Europe, 1785

Antique Map of Europe, 1785
An accurate map of Europe from the best authorities. London: C. Dilly & G. Robinson: 1785. Original size: 35.7 x 37.4 cm. Coloured, Inset: Spitsbergen, East and West Greenland, and Iceland



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The Common Market, also known as the UK European Communities Membership Referendum of 1975, sparked passionate debates and divided opinions across the nation. Home Secretary Roy Jenkins took center stage during a heated discussion on this pivotal issue. In the midst of it all, two young models made their voices heard through fashion. Beverly Pilkington, a 22-year-old from Essex, proudly donned a Pro Europe white tee shirt, while Siv Hederby from Sweden expressed her approval in a similar manner. Even traditional costumes became part of the campaign as pro-European women dressed up to show their support ahead of the referendum in Solihull. The fervor spread to Middlesbrough Town Centre where campaigners rallied for their cause in 1971. However, not everyone was swayed by the allure of the Common Market. An anti-Common Market newsagent in Redcar stood firm against its influence and voiced dissenting views. Public spaces like Speakers Corner at St Peters Square in Central Manchester became platforms for individuals to express their thoughts on this contentious matter. These gatherings allowed people from all walks of life to engage with one another and share differing perspectives. Ultimately, when voting day arrived in 1975, citizens cast their ballots either for or against membership in what had become known as the Common Market. The decision carried significant implications for Britain's future relationship with Europe. The Golden Egg - Or the goose that lost its quack; an Arthur Wragg cartoon aptly captured both sides' fears and hopes surrounding this momentous event. In retrospect, these images serve as reminders of a time when discussions about joining or leaving international unions stirred strong emotions within communities throughout Britain. The legacy of that era still resonates today as we navigate new challenges and opportunities within our ever-evolving global landscape.