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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Beijing Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 591 pictures in our Beijing collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Map of the Trans-Siberian Railway, produced by J. Bartholomew & Co., c.1920 (engraving) Featured Print

Map of the Trans-Siberian Railway, produced by J. Bartholomew & Co., c.1920 (engraving)

XJF696541 Map of the Trans-Siberian Railway, produced by J. Bartholomew & Co., c.1920 (engraving) by English School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Map shows both the Trans-Siberian and Trans-Mongolian routes. ); English, out of copyright

© Copyright: www.bridgemanart.com

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Phoenix International Media Centre (designed by Beijing Institute of Architectural Design Featured Print

Phoenix International Media Centre (designed by Beijing Institute of Architectural Design

Phoenix International Media Centre (designed by Beijing Institute of Architectural Design), Beijing, China

© Ian Trower / AWL Images Ltd

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China - The Ha-Ta-Men, one of the Great Gates of Peking Featured Print

China - The Ha-Ta-Men, one of the Great Gates of Peking

Lantern slide of The Ha-Ta-Men, one of the Great Gates of Peking (Beijing). The Chongwenmen Gate was popularly called Hatamen after the Mongol Prince Hata who lived in a nearby palace. The gate was in the city's former wall in the southeastern portion. The gate was torn down in the 1960s to make room for Beijing's Second Ring Road. Part of Box 159 Pekin, slide no. 18 Date: circa 1890s

© The Boswell Collection, Bexley Heritage Trust / Mary Evans