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Bacteriology Collection

"Bacteriology: Exploring the Microscopic World of Skin Disorders and Artwork" Delve into the fascinating realm of bacteriology

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Salmonella bacteria, SEM

Salmonella bacteria, SEM
Salmonella bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). Each rod-shaped structure is an individual bacterium. These bacteria occur mainly in human and animal intestines

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Salmonella bacteria, SEM

Salmonella bacteria, SEM
Salmonella bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria can cause food poisoning when eaten in contaminated food

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Skin disorders, artwork

Skin disorders, artwork
Skin disorders. Computer artwork showing the structure of the skin, and the layers affected by various skin disorders. Folliculitis is the inflammation of hair follicles; Bullae are blisters;

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Anthrax cultures, historical diagram

Anthrax cultures, historical diagram
Anthrax cultures. 1876 diagram of Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) bacteria cultured by Robert Koch. Along with Louis Pasteur, Koch is considered the founder of modern medical bacteriology

Background imageBacteriology Collection: E. coli bacteria, SEM

E. coli bacteria, SEM
E. coli bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria. These bacteria are a normal part of the intestinal flora in humans and other animals

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Coloured TEM of Yersinia pestis bacteria

Coloured TEM of Yersinia pestis bacteria
False colour transmission electron micrograph (SEM) of Yersinia pestis, a species of Gram negative, non- motile, capsulated

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Cell types, artwork

Cell types, artwork
Cell types. Cutaway artwork with a scale bar (upper right, in micrometres) showing the relative sizes of eukaryotic cells (those containing a nucleus) and prokaryotic cells (those lacking a nucleus)

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Tuberculosis bacteria

Tuberculosis bacteria. Computer artwork of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. These Gram- positive rod-shaped bacteria cause the disease tuberculosis

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Spiral spore chain of Streptomyces bacteria

Spiral spore chain of Streptomyces bacteria

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium

Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium
Salmonella sp. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Salmonella sp. bacterium. The cell is rod-shaped with long hair-like flagellae

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Flagellate bacteria

Flagellate bacteria. Computer artwork of a rod- shaped bacteria with polar flagella. Bacteria with a morphology similar to this include Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella sp

Background imageBacteriology Collection: E. coli bacterium

E. coli bacterium
Escherichia coli. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Escherichia coli bacterium. E. coli are Gram-negative bacilli (rod-shaped) bacteria

Background imageBacteriology Collection: E. coli bacteria

E. coli bacteria
False-colour transmission electron micrograph of the bacterium Escherichia coli, a normal inhabitant of the human intestine

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria
Staphylococcus aureus. Coloured Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM) of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These Gram-positive bacteria cause skin infections

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Yoghurt bacteria

Yoghurt bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus (spherical) and Lactobacillus bulgar- icus (rod-shaped) in live yoghurt. S

Background imageBacteriology Collection: E. coli bacteria, SEM

E. coli bacteria, SEM
E. coli bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria (purple) taken from the small intestine of a child. E

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageBacteriology Collection: E. coli bacterium, TEM

E. coli bacterium, TEM
E. coli bacterium, coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM). E. coli are Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the normal flora of the human gut

Background imageBacteriology Collection: MRSA resistant Staphylococcus bacteria

MRSA resistant Staphylococcus bacteria
MRSA: resistant Staphylococcus bacteria. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a deadly cluster of MRSA Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Background imageBacteriology Collection: PSCI2A-00043

PSCI2A-00043
Bacteriologist Elie Metchnikoff in his laboratory. Hand-colored halftone reproduction of a photograph

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Infections spread by sneezing, artwork C013 / 5949

Infections spread by sneezing, artwork C013 / 5949
Infections spread by sneezing. Computer artwork showing virus particles (virions, blue) and bacteria (rod-shaped) in the spray produced by someone when they sneeze

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Microscopic view of chlamydia

Microscopic view of chlamydia. Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a bacterium

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Flu virus particle, artwork F008 / 3245

Flu virus particle, artwork F008 / 3245
Flu virus particle, computer artwork. In the virus envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, pink) and neuraminidase (N, orange), which determine the strain of virus

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Salmonella bacteria, artwork C013 / 8818

Salmonella bacteria, artwork C013 / 8818
Salmonella bacteria, computer artwork. Salmonella sp. bacteria are gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria that have flagella (hair-like structures) that they use for locomotion

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Neutrophil cell trapping bacteria, SEM

Neutrophil cell trapping bacteria, SEM
Neutrophil cell trapping bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of bacteria (rod-shaped) being trapped by a neutrophil cell

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Microbiology caricature, 19th century

Microbiology caricature, 19th century
Microbiology caricature. The researcher is handling jars labelled as bacterial cultures, while the magnified view at left shows a caricatured appearance of microbes as seen under a microscope

Background imageBacteriology Collection: E. coli bacterium, TEM

E. coli bacterium, TEM
E. coli bacterium. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Escherichia coli bacterium in the early stages of binary fission, the process by which the bacterium divides

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Police Bacteriological Laboratory, 1914

Police Bacteriological Laboratory, 1914. From The Beautiful Rio De Janeiro by Alured Gray Bell. [William Heinemann, London, 1914]

Background imageBacteriology Collection: investigating rinderpest at Kimberley, South Africa: drawing, 1897

investigating rinderpest at Kimberley, South Africa: drawing, 1897
ROBERT KOCH (1843-1910) investigating rinderpest at Kimberley, South Africa: drawing, 1897

Background imageBacteriology Collection: MRSA bacteria, artwork F006 / 3102

MRSA bacteria, artwork F006 / 3102
MRSA bacteria. Computer artwork of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Salmonella culture

Salmonella culture
MODEL RELEASED. Salmonella culture. Microbiologist holding a petri dish containing a culture of Salmonella sp. bacteria. These bacteria are the cause of salmonellosis (food poisoning) in humans

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, SEM

Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, SEM
Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-positive rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Cyanobacteria, SEM

Cyanobacteria, SEM
Cyanobacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of cyanobacteria (formally known as blue-green algae, blue). Several spores (pink) are also seen

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Cholera bacteria, artwork

Cholera bacteria, artwork
Cholera bacteria. Artwork of Vibrio cholerae bacteria in the small intestine. These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria have a single polar flagellum (tail-like structure)

Background imageBacteriology Collection: E. coli 0157: H7 bacteria

E. coli 0157: H7 bacteria
E. coli 0157:H7 bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 bacteria, cause of foodborne illness

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Salmonella bacterium dividing, SEM

Salmonella bacterium dividing, SEM
Salmonella bacterium dividing. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of of a Salmonella bacterium dividing. The two new daughter cells are seen at upper right and lower left

Background imageBacteriology Collection: False-colour TEM of Salmonella typhi

False-colour TEM of Salmonella typhi

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Cholera toxin, molecular model

Cholera toxin, molecular model
Cholera toxin. Molecular model of the secondary structure of cholera enterotoxin (intestinal toxin). The molecule consists of two subunits, A (top) and B (bottom)

Background imageBacteriology Collection: False-colour TEM of bacterium E. Coli

False-colour TEM of bacterium E. Coli
False colour transmission electron micrograph of the bacterium Escherichia coli, a normal member of human intestinal flora

Background imageBacteriology Collection: E. coli bacterium dividing

E. coli bacterium dividing

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Chains of Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria

Chains of Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Robert Koch (1843-1910) German bacteriologist and physician in his laboratory

Robert Koch (1843-1910) German bacteriologist and physician in his laboratory
530414 Robert Koch (1843-1910) German bacteriologist and physician in his laboratory. In 1890 Koch introduced Tuberculin which he thought was a cure for Tuberculosis

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) French chemist

Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) French chemist
539137 Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) French chemist.; (add.info.: Bacteriology. Hydrophobia. Inoculation by attenuated culture)

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Bacteriology - Dr. George Stiles, 1912. Creator: Harris & Ewing. Bacteriology - Dr

Bacteriology - Dr. George Stiles, 1912. Creator: Harris & Ewing. Bacteriology - Dr. George Stiles, 1912
Bacteriology - Dr. George Stiles, 1912. [Two women and man in laboratory - USA?]

Background imageBacteriology Collection: Bacteriology - Dr. George Stiles, 1912. Creator: Harris & Ewing. Bacteriology - Dr

Bacteriology - Dr. George Stiles, 1912. Creator: Harris & Ewing. Bacteriology - Dr. George Stiles, 1912
Bacteriology - Dr. George Stiles, 1912. [Two women and man in laboratory - USA?]

Background imageBacteriology Collection: International biohazard symbol

International biohazard symbol warning of a potential biological hazard. This symbol is used worldwide in laboratories and on containers where biologically active agents are present



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"Bacteriology: Exploring the Microscopic World of Skin Disorders and Artwork" Delve into the fascinating realm of bacteriology, where intricate artwork meets skin disorders. Through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we witness the captivating beauty of E. Coli bacteria, their distinctive rod-like shapes forming a mesmerizing pattern. Salmonella bacteria also reveal their unique structure under SEM, showcasing their spherical forms with intriguing surface details. In a colored transmission electron micrograph (TEM), Yersinia pestis bacteria come to life in vibrant hues, highlighting the diversity within cell types. This artistic representation allows us to appreciate the complexity and intricacy of these microscopic organisms that can cause severe diseases like plague. Travel back in time as historical diagrams depict Anthrax cultures, revealing how scientists once studied this deadly disease. The tuberculosis bacteria are captured in all their glory; their slender rods painting a somber picture of one of humanity's oldest foes. Witness nature's creativity through the spiral spore chain formation of Streptomyces bacteria – an enchanting display resembling delicate strands woven together with precision. Flagellate bacteria showcase their remarkable motility through whip-like appendages called flagella, propelling themselves forward with grace and agility. Elevating our understanding further is an up-close encounter with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria – notorious for causing various infections ranging from minor skin conditions to life-threatening illnesses. Their distinct clusters become apparent as they thrive amidst human hosts. Amongst this diverse microbial world stands E. coli bacterium - its presence ubiquitous yet often misunderstood due to its association with foodborne illnesses. However, it plays crucial roles in digestion and research breakthroughs alike. Bacteriology unravels the hidden wonders within our microbiome while shedding light on pathogens that challenge human health daily. As we explore these captivating images and delve deeper into this field, we gain insights into both artistry at a microscopic level and the complex interplay between bacteria and human biology.