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Bacteria Collection

"Bacteria: The Microscopic Marvels of Yellowstone National Park" In the heart of Wyoming, USA lies the breathtaking Yellowstone National Park

Background imageBacteria Collection: Salmonella bacteria, SEM

Salmonella bacteria, SEM
Salmonella bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). Each rod-shaped structure is an individual bacterium. These bacteria occur mainly in human and animal intestines

Background imageBacteria Collection: Salmonella bacteria, SEM

Salmonella bacteria, SEM
Salmonella bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria can cause food poisoning when eaten in contaminated food

Background imageBacteria Collection: Picture No. 11675590

Picture No. 11675590
Macro Photograph. Date:

Background imageBacteria Collection: Grand Prismatic Spring, Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Grand Prismatic Spring, Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Background imageBacteria Collection: Grand Prismatic Spring, Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Grand Prismatic Spring, Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Background imageBacteria Collection: Neutrophil engulfing MRSA, SEM C018 / 8596

Neutrophil engulfing MRSA, SEM C018 / 8596
Neutrophil engulfing MRSA. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a neutrophil white blood cell (green) engulfing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (MRSA, pink)

Background imageBacteria Collection: Anthrax cultures, historical diagram

Anthrax cultures, historical diagram
Anthrax cultures. 1876 diagram of Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) bacteria cultured by Robert Koch. Along with Louis Pasteur, Koch is considered the founder of modern medical bacteriology

Background imageBacteria Collection: E. coli bacteria, SEM

E. coli bacteria, SEM
E. coli bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria. These bacteria are a normal part of the intestinal flora in humans and other animals

Background imageBacteria Collection: Coloured TEM of Yersinia pestis bacteria

Coloured TEM of Yersinia pestis bacteria
False colour transmission electron micrograph (SEM) of Yersinia pestis, a species of Gram negative, non- motile, capsulated

Background imageBacteria Collection: C. elegans worms, light micrograph

C. elegans worms, light micrograph
C. elegans worms. Confocal laser scanning micrograph of Caenorhabditis elegans worms. Neurons (nerve cells) are green and the digestive tract is red. C

Background imageBacteria Collection: Computer artwork of a beta DNA segment and spheres

Computer artwork of a beta DNA segment and spheres
DNA molecule. Computer artwork of part of a strand of beta DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) seen on a background of spheres. The spheres may represent bacteria

Background imageBacteria Collection: Cell types, artwork

Cell types, artwork
Cell types. Cutaway artwork with a scale bar (upper right, in micrometres) showing the relative sizes of eukaryotic cells (those containing a nucleus) and prokaryotic cells (those lacking a nucleus)

Background imageBacteria Collection: Tuberculosis bacteria

Tuberculosis bacteria. Computer artwork of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. These Gram- positive rod-shaped bacteria cause the disease tuberculosis

Background imageBacteria Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageBacteria Collection: Spiral spore chain of Streptomyces bacteria

Spiral spore chain of Streptomyces bacteria

Background imageBacteria Collection: Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium

Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium
Salmonella sp. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Salmonella sp. bacterium. The cell is rod-shaped with long hair-like flagellae

Background imageBacteria Collection: Bacteria infecting a macrophage, SEM

Bacteria infecting a macrophage, SEM
Bacteria infecting a macrophage. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria (purple) infecting a macrophage white blood cell

Background imageBacteria Collection: Flagellate bacteria

Flagellate bacteria. Computer artwork of a rod- shaped bacteria with polar flagella. Bacteria with a morphology similar to this include Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella sp

Background imageBacteria Collection: E. coli bacterium

E. coli bacterium
Escherichia coli. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Escherichia coli bacterium. E. coli are Gram-negative bacilli (rod-shaped) bacteria

Background imageBacteria Collection: E. coli bacteria

E. coli bacteria
False-colour transmission electron micrograph of the bacterium Escherichia coli, a normal inhabitant of the human intestine

Background imageBacteria Collection: Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria
Staphylococcus aureus. Coloured Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM) of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These Gram-positive bacteria cause skin infections

Background imageBacteria Collection: Yoghurt bacteria

Yoghurt bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus (spherical) and Lactobacillus bulgar- icus (rod-shaped) in live yoghurt. S

Background imageBacteria Collection: E. coli bacteria, SEM

E. coli bacteria, SEM
E. coli bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria (purple) taken from the small intestine of a child. E

Background imageBacteria Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageBacteria Collection: E. coli bacterium, TEM

E. coli bacterium, TEM
E. coli bacterium, coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM). E. coli are Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the normal flora of the human gut

Background imageBacteria Collection: MRSA resistant Staphylococcus bacteria

MRSA resistant Staphylococcus bacteria
MRSA: resistant Staphylococcus bacteria. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a deadly cluster of MRSA Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Background imageBacteria Collection: Macro Photograph: Patterns of Paenibacillus bacteria on petri dish - C type (chiral)

Macro Photograph: Patterns of Paenibacillus bacteria on petri dish - C type (chiral)
LRDS-218 Macro Photograph: Patterns of Paenibacillus bacteria on petri dish - C type (chiral) magnification x25 (A4 size: 29.7 cm width)

Background imageBacteria Collection: Protozoa, a single-celled organism that feeds by scavenging for particles

Protozoa, a single-celled organism that feeds by scavenging for particles and other microorganisms, such as bacteria, or by absorbing nutrients from their environment

Background imageBacteria Collection: Bacterial meningitis, MRI scan

Bacterial meningitis, MRI scan
Bacterial meningitis. Coloured magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of an axial section through the brain of a 16-year-old patient

Background imageBacteria Collection: Louis Pasteur, French microbiologist

Louis Pasteur, French microbiologist
Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), French microbiologist and chemist. Louis Pasteur proved the germ theory of disease, which holds that germs attack the body from the outside

Background imageBacteria Collection: Macrophage engulfing TB bacteria, SEM

Macrophage engulfing TB bacteria, SEM
Macrophage engulfing TB bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a macrophage white blood cell (purple) engulfing a tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) bacterium (pink)

Background imageBacteria Collection: Macro Photograph: Patterns of Paenibacillus bacteria on petri dish - T type

Macro Photograph: Patterns of Paenibacillus bacteria on petri dish - T type (tip-splitting morphotype)
LRDS-232 Macro Photograph: Patterns of Paenibacillus bacteria on petri dish - T type (tip-splitting morphotype) magnification x5.6 (A4 size)

Background imageBacteria Collection: Infections spread by sneezing, artwork C013 / 5949

Infections spread by sneezing, artwork C013 / 5949
Infections spread by sneezing. Computer artwork showing virus particles (virions, blue) and bacteria (rod-shaped) in the spray produced by someone when they sneeze

Background imageBacteria Collection: Microscopic view of chlamydia

Microscopic view of chlamydia. Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a bacterium

Background imageBacteria Collection: Salmonella bacteria, artwork C013 / 8818

Salmonella bacteria, artwork C013 / 8818
Salmonella bacteria, computer artwork. Salmonella sp. bacteria are gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria that have flagella (hair-like structures) that they use for locomotion

Background imageBacteria Collection: Used dental floss, SEM

Used dental floss, SEM
Used dental floss. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of dental plaque on strands of used dental floss. Plaque consists of a film of bacteria embedded in a glycoprotein matrix

Background imageBacteria Collection: Neutrophil cell trapping bacteria, SEM

Neutrophil cell trapping bacteria, SEM
Neutrophil cell trapping bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of bacteria (rod-shaped) being trapped by a neutrophil cell

Background imageBacteria Collection: Microbiology caricature, 19th century

Microbiology caricature, 19th century
Microbiology caricature. The researcher is handling jars labelled as bacterial cultures, while the magnified view at left shows a caricatured appearance of microbes as seen under a microscope

Background imageBacteria Collection: E. coli bacterium, TEM

E. coli bacterium, TEM
E. coli bacterium. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Escherichia coli bacterium in the early stages of binary fission, the process by which the bacterium divides

Background imageBacteria Collection: Louis Pasteur, French microbiologist

Louis Pasteur, French microbiologist
Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), French microbiologist and chemist, in his laboratory. Louis Pasteur proved the germ theory of disease, which holds that germs attack the body from the outside

Background imageBacteria Collection: Bacteria infecting a macrophage, SEM

Bacteria infecting a macrophage, SEM
Bacteria infecting a macrophage. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria (purple) infecting a macrophage white blood cell

Background imageBacteria Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageBacteria Collection: MRSA bacteria, artwork F006 / 3102

MRSA bacteria, artwork F006 / 3102
MRSA bacteria. Computer artwork of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria

Background imageBacteria Collection: Salmonella culture

Salmonella culture
MODEL RELEASED. Salmonella culture. Microbiologist holding a petri dish containing a culture of Salmonella sp. bacteria. These bacteria are the cause of salmonellosis (food poisoning) in humans

Background imageBacteria Collection: Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, SEM

Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, SEM
Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-positive rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water

Background imageBacteria Collection: Vinegar production, 19th century

Vinegar production, 19th century cutaway artwork. This is a trickling method developed in 1823 by the German chemist Schutzenbach. The barrel is divided into three sections

Background imageBacteria Collection: Cyanobacteria, SEM

Cyanobacteria, SEM
Cyanobacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of cyanobacteria (formally known as blue-green algae, blue). Several spores (pink) are also seen



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"Bacteria: The Microscopic Marvels of Yellowstone National Park" In the heart of Wyoming, USA lies the breathtaking Yellowstone National Park, a haven for nature enthusiasts and scientists alike. Amidst its natural wonders, one can find an extraordinary display of microbial life at the Grand Prismatic Spring in the Midway Geyser Basin. Picture No. 11675590 captures this mesmerizing sight, showcasing vibrant hues that seem to dance upon the water's surface. However, what may appear as an artistic masterpiece is actually a thriving community of bacteria. Zooming in closer with SEM C018 / 8596 reveals a neutrophil engulfing MRSA - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This image serves as a reminder of how these tiny organisms can pose significant threats to human health. Another SEM image showcases E. Coli bacteria, reminding us that not all it can harmful; some play crucial roles in our digestive system and even aid scientific research. Moving back to Yellowstone's enchantment, we encounter Salmonella bacteria through another captivating SEM photograph. These microscopic creatures serve as a stark reminder that even within such serene landscapes, dangers lurk unseen. Coloured TEM imagery introduces us to Yersinia pestis bacteria – responsible for causing devastating outbreaks like the infamous Black Death throughout history. Such visuals emphasize their intricate structures and highlight why understanding them is vital for public health efforts. Venturing beyond real-life images into computer artwork brings forth a beta DNA segment surrounded by spheres—a representation of genetic material essential for bacterial survival and reproduction. Artistic depictions also shed light on various cell types found within these microorganisms' complex world—each playing unique roles necessary for their survival and proliferation. Historical diagrams reveal cultures of Anthrax—an infectious disease with severe consequences if left unchecked—underscoring humanity's ongoing battle against bacterial infections throughout time. Tuberculosis bacteria make their appearance too—a haunting reminder that despite medical advancements, infectious diseases continue to challenge us.