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Atmospheric Phenomenon Collection

Witness the breathtaking beauty as nature paints the sky with vibrant hues

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora over Antarctica, satellite image

Aurora over Antarctica, satellite image
Aurora over Antarctica, ultraviolet satellite image. Australia is at upper left. This is the aurora australis (green ring), the southern lights display

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora borealis

Aurora borealis seen over trees through a fish-eye lens, with an observer at far right. This light display (the northern lights) is seen in the night sky at high latitudes

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora borealis display with setting Moon

Aurora borealis display with setting Moon
Aurora. Green aurora borealis (northern lights) display over a field of ice with a setting Moon. Aurorae are caused by charged particles from the Sun stimulating gas molecules in the Earths

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora borealis

Aurora borealis. This coloured atmospheric light display (the northern lights) is visible in the night sky at high latitudes

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora borealis or northern lights and Ursa Major

Aurora borealis or northern lights and Ursa Major
Aurora Borealis. Green, yellow and red Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights display over clouds and trees. The plough in the constellation of Ursa Major is prominent at upper left

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora borealis

Aurora borealis. Fish-eye lens view of a tree silhouetted against a red aurora borealis or northern lights display in the night sky

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora borealis

Aurora borealis or northern lights display over silhouetted conifer trees. Aurorae are caused by the interaction between energetic charged particles from the Sun

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora borealis in Alaska

Aurora borealis in Alaska
Aurora borealis over the treeline. The aurora borealis (northern lights) is an atmospheric phenomenon that occurs at high latitudes, appearing as shimmering bands of coloured light in the sky

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Coriolis effect, artwork C017 / 7212

Coriolis effect, artwork C017 / 7212
Coriolis effect. Computer artwork of a globe, showing how the Coriolis effect affects the motion (red arrows) of free-moving objects in the northern and southern hemispheres of the Earth

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Jet stream cirrus clouds C016 / 5818

Jet stream cirrus clouds C016 / 5818
Jet stream cirrus clouds over a snowy landscape. Cirrus clouds are found at altitudes of over 5 kilometres. They consist of tiny ice crystals blown by the wind into wispy cloud shapes

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Global winds, satellite-based diagram C016 / 3731

Global winds, satellite-based diagram C016 / 3731
Global winds, satellite-based diagram. The rotation of this Earth globe (dark blue arrow) and the Coriolis effect causes the wind patterns shown

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Coriolis effect, artwork C017 / 7211

Coriolis effect, artwork C017 / 7211
Coriolis effect. Computer artwork of a globe, showing how the Coriolis effect affects the motion (red arrows) of free-moving objects in the northern and southern hemispheres of the Earth

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Sky phenomena, 16th century C017 / 6993

Sky phenomena, 16th century C017 / 6993
Sky phenomena. 16th-century woodcut showing the Sun (Halo), the Milky Way (Galaxia), a rainbow (Iris) and a comet (Cometa)

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Saturns north pole region, Cassini image

Saturns north pole region, Cassini image. This north polar hexagon region of the gas giant planet Saturn is in sunlight as spring comes to the planets northern hemisphere

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Coriolis effect, artwork C016 / 7691

Coriolis effect, artwork C016 / 7691
Coriolis effect. Computer artwork of an Earth globe, showing how the rotation of the Earth (white arrow) affects the motion (yellow arrows) of the winds at different locations on the Earth

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Cumulus thundercloud, diagram C018 / 0293

Cumulus thundercloud, diagram C018 / 0293
Cumulus thundercloud. Diagram showing the formation of a thunderstorm cloud (white) along a cold front, where cold air (blue arrow) sinks down

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Auroras at night, satellite image

Auroras at night, satellite image
Auroras at night. Black marble satellite image of the Aurora Borealis (Northern lights) over Ontario, Canada, at night. Aurora are atmospheric phenomena that occur when solar wind particles are

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Northern Lights explained, artwork C016 / 8113

Northern Lights explained, artwork C016 / 8113
Northern Lights explained. Computer artwork showing the explosion of energy (bright, right) responsible for sudden increases in the brightness and movement of the Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis)

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Northern lights, Iceland C018 / 2276

Northern lights, Iceland C018 / 2276
Northern lights, or Aurora Borealis, over the Vatnajokull ice cap, Iceland. Auroral displays are caused by interactions between energetic charged particles from the Sun, and the Earths atmosphere

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Northern lights, Iceland C018 / 2271

Northern lights, Iceland C018 / 2271
Northern lights, or Aurora Borealis, and a full Moon. Auroral displays are caused by interactions between energetic charged particles from the Sun, and the Earths atmosphere

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Northern lights, Iceland C018 / 2270

Northern lights, Iceland C018 / 2270
Northern lights, or Aurora Borealis, and a full Moon. Auroral displays are caused by interactions between energetic charged particles from the Sun, and the Earths atmosphere

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Northern lights and comet PanSTARRS C018 / 2269

Northern lights and comet PanSTARRS C018 / 2269
Northern lights, or Aurora Borealis, and comet PanSTARRS (C/2011 L4, bottom right). Discovered in June 2011 with the Pan-STARRS telescope in Hawaii, this comet reached perihelion on 10 March 2013

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Ice pillar in night sky C016 / 5819

Ice pillar in night sky C016 / 5819
Ice pillar in night sky. This atmospheric optical phenomenon is formed by the reflection of light by ice crystals in the air. Photographed near Sodankyla in northern Finland

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Fogbow and snowy landscape C016 / 5820

Fogbow and snowy landscape C016 / 5820
Fogbow and snowy landscape. Cross-country skiers passing by frosted trees with a fogbow visible at upper right. Fogbows occur when the water droplets in the air are less than half a millimetre in

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Mammatus clouds C016 / 5817

Mammatus clouds C016 / 5817
Mammatus clouds at the edge of a thunderstorm. Mammatus clouds have a pouch-like appearance and form in the presence of sinking air. These clouds are associated with turbulent and stormy weather

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Pakistan-India at night, ISS image C016 / 4204

Pakistan-India at night, ISS image C016 / 4204
Pakistan-India at night. View from the International Space Station (ISS) of the western Himalayas (left) with the city lights of northern Pakistan and India (upper right) on the Indo-Gangetic Plain

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Saharan dust plume, Bay of Biscay C016 / 3874

Saharan dust plume, Bay of Biscay C016 / 3874
Saharan dust plume, Bay of Biscay. Satellite image of a dust plume (brown) from the Sahara, stretching across the Bay of Biscay and the Atlantic from Spain (lower right) to Ireland and the UK (top)

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Cloud layers, ISS image C016 / 3872

Cloud layers, ISS image C016 / 3872
Cloud layers. View from the International Space Station (ISS) of cloud layers in Earths atmosphere over eastern Brazil. The blue haze is the upper regions of Earths atmosphere

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Thunderstorms, space shuttle image C016 / 3867

Thunderstorms, space shuttle image C016 / 3867
Thunderstorms. Space shuttle image of multiple thunderstorm cells (lower frame and at upper right) in Earths atmosphere. This view is from the space shuttle Discovery

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Earths atmosphere, cutaway Earth globe

Earths atmosphere, cutaway Earth globe. Computer graphic of an Earth globe centred on the Atlantic Ocean and a cutaway atmosphere, generated using satellite and mapping data

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Southern hawker dragonfly

Southern hawker dragonfly
Aircraft contrail. Aircraft contrails are artificial clouds formed from frozen water droplets from the exhaust of the engines of an aircraft

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Waterspouts

Waterspouts close to a ship, historical artwork. Waterspouts form where a tornado touches down on water, instead of land. A tornado is a rapidly rotating funnel of air that can form below certain

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Tornado, historical artwork

Tornado, historical artwork
Tornado. Coloured historical artwork of a mother and child fleeing from a tornado. A tornado is a rapidly rotating funnel of air that can form below certain types of storm clouds

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Tornado, historical artwork

Tornado, historical artwork
Tornado (or whirlwind), historical artwork. Mother and child fleeing from a tornado. A tornado is a rapidly rotating funnel of air that can form below certain types of storm clouds

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurorae on Jupiter

Aurorae on Jupiter. Coloured ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of aurorae (light blue) at the north pole of Jupiter

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Waterspout, historical artwork

Waterspout, historical artwork
Waterspout threatening a ship, historical artwork. Waterspouts form where a tornado touches down on water, instead of land

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Early sighting of Brocken spectres, 1797

Early sighting of Brocken spectres, 1797
Early sighting of Brocken spectres. Historical artwork of a sighting of Brocken spectres, based on the account of a traveller called Hane

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora from space

Aurora from space
Aurora borealis. Coloured combined ultraviolet and optical image of an aurora borealis (northern lights) display seen from space. The aurorae are seen as a ring of light around the North Pole

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora borealis display reflected upon water

Aurora borealis display reflected upon water
An aurora borealis display (northern lights) reflected on the surface of water. Aurorae are caused by the interaction between energetic charged particles coming from the Sun

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora watching, time-exposure image

Aurora watching, time-exposure image
Aurora watching. Time-exposure image of an aurora watcher by a fire, observing an auroral display in the northern hemisphere

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: View of an aurora borealis display

View of an aurora borealis display (blue) centred on the constellation of Ursa Major. Aurorae are caused by the interaction between energetic charged particles coming from the Sun

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Coastal fog

Coastal fog. Fog forms when a body of warm and moist air contacts cold air. As cold air can carry less water vapour than warm air, the vapour condenses to water droplets

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Sundogs and halo

Sundogs and halo
Sundogs with halo. Trees silhouetted against the Sun, which is surrounded by a halo (circular) and sundogs (bright areas to left and right of the Sun)

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) seen in Finland

Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) seen in Finland
Aurora Borealis. Spectacular blue-green display of the Aurora Borealis (or Northern Lights) as seen in Finland. Aurorae occur when charged cosmic particles become trapped in the Earths magnetic

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora australis - the Southern Lights

Aurora australis - the Southern Lights - seen above the British Antarctic Surveys Halley Station, Antarctica

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora Borealis display over Manitoba, Canada

Aurora Borealis display over Manitoba, Canada
Aurora Borealis. Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights display over a large boulder on snow. Aurorae are caused by the interaction between energetic charged particles from the Sun

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: View of a spectacular, colourful aurora borealis

View of a spectacular, colourful aurora borealis
View of a colourful aurora borealis display (northern lights). Aurorae are caused by the interaction between energetic charged particles coming from the Sun

Background imageAtmospheric Phenomenon Collection: Aurora Borealis display with clouds

Aurora Borealis display with clouds
Aurora Borealis. Clouds partially obscuring a dramatic multicoloured Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights display. Aurorae are caused by the interaction between energetic charged particles from



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Witness the breathtaking beauty as nature paints the sky with vibrant hues. In a remote corner of Antarctica, an ethereal display unfolds - an Aurora over Antarctica captured by a satellite image, illuminating the icy landscape below. Moving northward, we find ourselves in awe of the celestial dance between the Aurora borealis and the setting Moon. The night sky becomes alive with shimmering curtains of green and purple, intertwining gracefully above us. As we venture deeper into Alaska's wilderness, another enchanting spectacle awaits - an extraordinary show put on by Mother Nature herself. The mesmerizing Aurora borealis takes center stage once again, casting its spell upon all who bear witness to its magnificence. Against a backdrop of Ursa Major constellation, this celestial ballet leaves us humbled by its sheer grandeur. Each occurrence is unique and captivating in its own right; no two displays are ever alike. With every flicker and swirl across the night canvas, these atmospheric phenomena remind us that there is still so much magic left to discover in our world. So let your eyes wander upwards towards the heavens and be transported to a realm where reality blends seamlessly with dreams. Allow yourself to be captivated by these natural wonders that paint our skies with their radiant colors - for it is within these moments that we truly understand how small we are in comparison to the vastness of our universe. In this symphony of light and motion, time seems suspended as we become one with nature's artistry. Whether it be witnessing an Aurora over Antarctica or being awestruck by an unforgettable display in Alaska, each encounter reminds us that there is something greater than ourselves at play here – something beyond comprehension yet undeniably beautiful. So embrace these fleeting moments when Earth meets sky in perfect harmony; they serve as gentle reminders that even amidst chaos and uncertainty, there exists unparalleled beauty waiting to be discovered if only we take a moment to look up.