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Astronomical Collection

Astronomical wonders unfold before our eyes, revealing the vastness and beauty of the cosmos

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Pale Blue Dot, Voyager 1

Pale Blue Dot, Voyager 1
This unique narrow-angle color image is of the Earth, dubbed Pale Blue Dot, is a part of the first ever portrait of the solar system taken by Voyager 1

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Hubble Ultra Deep Field 2012

Hubble Ultra Deep Field 2012. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared image of distant galaxies in a region of the sky in the constellation of Fornax

Background imageAstronomical Collection: A View of Geelong, 1856 (oil on canvas)

A View of Geelong, 1856 (oil on canvas)
7064112 A View of Geelong, 1856 (oil on canvas) by Guerard, Eugen von (1811-1901); 154.5x89 cm; Private Collection; Austrian, out of copyright

Background imageAstronomical Collection: The Great Astronomer Schiaparelli at the Brera Observatory (colour litho)

The Great Astronomer Schiaparelli at the Brera Observatory (colour litho)
2798364 The Great Astronomer Schiaparelli at the Brera Observatory (colour litho) by Beltrame, Achille (1871-1945); Private Collection; (add.info)

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Messier objects, full set

Messier objects, full set
Messier objects. These 110 astronomical objects were catalogued by the French astronomer Charles Messier (1730-1817), a comet hunter who wanted to list the permanent objects in the sky that might be

Background imageAstronomical Collection: The Plough asterism in Ursa Major

The Plough asterism in Ursa Major
The Plough. This asterism (group of stars) is part of the much larger constellation Ursa Major, most of which is out of frame

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Earthrise photograph, artwork

Earthrise photograph, artwork
Earthrise photograph. Artwork based on the famous Earthrise photographs taken by the Apollo 8 astronauts Frank Borman and William Anders

Background imageAstronomical Collection: The Orrery by Joseph Wright

The Orrery by Joseph Wright (1734-1797). This artwork was painted in 1766. Its full title is A Philospher giving a Lecture on the Orrery in which a Lamp is put in place of the Sun

Background imageAstronomical Collection: 1919 solar eclipse

1919 solar eclipse. Image 2 of 3. This set of images, taken by the British astronomer Arthur Eddington (1882-1944), confirmed Einsteins theory of general relativity

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Orion nebula

Orion nebula. Coloured composite infrared and visible light image of the Orion nebula M42. This emission nebula, a cloud of gas and dust in which starbirth takes place

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Hubble Ultra Deep Field galaxies

Hubble Ultra Deep Field galaxies
Ultra Deep Field galaxies. Hubble Space Telescope Ultra Deep Field, the deepest view ever taken of the universe in 2004. Each dot of light is a separate galaxy

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Orions belt

Orions belt. Optical image of the line of three bright stars making up the belt in the constellation of Orion. The stars are, from lower left to upper right: Alnitak (Zeta Orionis)

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Pillars of Creation

Pillars of Creation, combined Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope image. These towering columns are formed of interstellar hydrogen gas and dust

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Gas pillars in the Eagle Nebula

Gas pillars in the Eagle Nebula. Hubble Space Telescope image showing dark pillars of dense molecular hydrogen and dust in the Eagle Nebula (M16)

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Nebula Sh 2-106, HST image

Nebula Sh 2-106, HST image
Nebula Sh 2-106, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image. Combined optical and infrared image of the compact star-forming region and emission nebula Sharpless 2-106 (Sh 2-106)

Background imageAstronomical Collection: 1919 solar eclipse

1919 solar eclipse
^B1919 solar eclipse. Image 1 of 3.^b This set of images, taken by the British astronomer Arthur Eddington (1882-1944), confirmed Einsteins theory of general relativity

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Cosmic microwave background

Cosmic microwave background. Spherical projection of the cosmic microwave background, using all-sky data from the WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe)

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Celestial mechanics, medieval artwork

Celestial mechanics, medieval artwork
Celestial mechanics. Coloured historical artwork depicting a medieval pilgrim looking out from the sky (blue) to see the mechanics of the heavens (upper left)

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Full Moon

Full Moon. The Moon appears full when it is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun during its orbit, when it presents its full sunlit face to Earth

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Solar system planets

Solar system planets. Artwork showing the Sun (left) and the eight planets of the solar system and their orbits. From left to right they are: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Sombrero galaxy (M104), HST image

Sombrero galaxy (M104), HST image
Sombrero galaxy (M104, NGC 4594), Hubble Space Telescope image. This spiral galaxy is seen almost edge-on to Earth. Its disc is seen as a dark band of dust crossing the brighter central bulge

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Catalan Atlas, 14th century

Catalan Atlas, 14th century. The 6-page Catalan Atlas (1375) was produced on vellum by the Jewish cartographer Abraham Cresques

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Solar System, artwork

Solar System, artwork
Solar System. Artwork of Earths solar system, showing the planets and other objects that orbit the Sun (upper right). The separations of the orbits are not shown to scale

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Carl Sagan, US astronomer

Carl Sagan, US astronomer
Carl Edward Sagan (1934-1996), US astronomer and astrochemist. Sagan was a consultant and adviser to NASA, and worked on the Apollo mission, as well as the Mariner, Viking, Voyager

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Crab nebula (M1)

Crab nebula (M1), Hubble Space Telescope image. This is a supernova remnant, the remains of a star that ended its life in a massine supernova explosion

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Milky Way

Milky Way, optical image. The Milky Way is our own galaxy. Because Earth lies in one of its spiral arms, we look into the central mass of stars and see the galaxy as a band of light crossing the sky

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Orion nebula (M42)

Orion nebula (M42), optical image. This is a huge starbirth region, where gas is coalescing to form new stars. Radiation from the hot young stars ionises the gases in the nebula

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Jupiter and Io, New Horizons image

Jupiter and Io, New Horizons image
Jupiter and Io. Montage of images of Jupiter (left) and its moon Io (right), obtained by the New Horizons spacecraft in February and March 2007 as it passed Jupiter on its way to Pluto

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Cygnus and Lyra constellations

Cygnus and Lyra constellations. Cygnus, the swan, is at centre left, with Lyra, the lyre, at centre right. The brightest star is Cygnus is Deneb (Alpha Cygni, upper left)

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Antennae colliding galaxies, Hubble image

Antennae colliding galaxies, Hubble image
Antennae colliding galaxies, Hubble Space Telescope image. The Antennae (NGC 4038 and NGC 4039) are formed of two galaxies colliding due to mutual gravitational attraction

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Immanuel Kant, caricature

Immanuel Kant, caricature
Immanuel Kant. Caricature of the German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724-1804). Kant published various influential philosophical works on the natural sciences, particularly geophysics and astronomy

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Early map of the Moon, 1810

Early map of the Moon, 1810
Map of the Moon, 1810. This plate depicts the geographical features of the moon using observations by Cassini and Riccioli

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Scorpius constellation

Scorpius constellation. This is a large zodiacal constellation in the southern hemisphere that is visible in summer. The Sun passes though it in late November

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Crab nebula, composite image

Crab nebula, composite image
Crab nebula. Composite x-ray, infrared and optical image of the Crab nebula (M1), a remnant of a supernova that exploded in AD 1054

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Solar system planets

Solar system planets. Computer artwork of the eight planets of the solar system, which are arrayed from left to right in order of distance from the Sun (left)

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Moon rising over Earths horizon

Moon rising over Earths horizon, composite image. The blue haze of Earths atmosphere can be seen above the horizon. Earth is thought to be the only planet in the solar system that can support life

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Eagle Nebula

Eagle Nebula. Optical image of the Eagle Nebula (M16, NGC 6611). This is an emission nebula, a cloud of gas that glows as the hydrogen gas it contains is ionised by radiation from the hot young stars

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Saturns rings, Cassini image

Saturns rings, Cassini image. The rings consist of particles of nearly pure water ice and meteoric dust and span almost 300, 000 kilometres

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Spiral galaxy M81, composite image

Spiral galaxy M81, composite image in visible (yellow), infrared (red), and ultraviolet (blue) light. The yellow centre indicates older stars, the blue areas in the spiral arms are hot, young stars

Background imageAstronomical Collection: 1919 solar eclipse

1919 solar eclipse
^B1919 solar eclipse. Image 3 of 3.^b This set of images, taken by the British astronomer Arthur Eddington (1882-1944), confirmed Einsteins theory of general relativity

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Epicycles of Mercury and Venus, 1823 C017 / 8061

Epicycles of Mercury and Venus, 1823 C017 / 8061
Epicycles of Mercury and Venus, 19th-century diagram. This geocentric (Earth-centred) model shows the orbits of Mercury and Venus as a series of epicycles (loops)

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Supernova explosion, artwork

Supernova explosion, artwork
Supernova explosion, computer artwork. Supernovas are the explosive deaths of massive stars

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Martian landscape, Spirit rover image

Martian landscape, Spirit rover image
Martian landscape. False-colour image of the Martian surface taken by NASAs Mars exploration rover Spirit between the 23rd and 24th November 2005. Part of the rover can be seen at bottom centre

Background imageAstronomical Collection: The Astronomical Clock or Orloj, Old Town City Hall in Prague

The Astronomical Clock or Orloj, Old Town City Hall in Prague
The Orloj or Astronomical Clock on the Old Town City Hall in Old Town Square in Prague, Czech Republic

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Orion constellation

Orion constellation. The most prominent feature of the constellation is Orions Belt, a row of three bright stars (centre left)

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Aurora over Antarctica, satellite image

Aurora over Antarctica, satellite image
Aurora over Antarctica, ultraviolet satellite image. Australia is at upper left. This is the aurora australis (green ring), the southern lights display

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Saturn, Cassini image

Saturn, Cassini image
Saturn. Cassini spacecraft image of Saturn, its rings, and two of its moons Titan (upper right) and Tethys (bottom left). The rings, which consist of particles of nearly pure water ice

Background imageAstronomical Collection: Jupiter from Europa, artwork

Jupiter from Europa, artwork
Jupiter from Europa. Computer artwork of a view towards Jupiter and its moons, across the surface of Europa as it might have looked four billion years ago



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Astronomical wonders unfold before our eyes, revealing the vastness and beauty of the cosmos. From the iconic Pale Blue Dot captured by Voyager 1 to the mesmerizing Hubble Ultra Deep Field 2012 image, we are reminded of our place in this infinite expanse. The historic 1919 solar eclipse confirmed Einstein's theory of general relativity, forever altering our understanding of space-time. Gazing up at the night sky, we find solace in familiar constellations like The Plough asterism in Ursa Major and Orions belt, guiding us through the celestial tapestry. Joseph Wright's Orrery brings to life a mechanical representation of our solar system, reminding us of its intricate workings. The Hubble Ultra Deep Field galaxies captivate with their sheer number and diversity, showcasing countless cosmic marvels waiting to be explored. The Messier objects present a full set of celestial treasures for astronomers to uncover and study. Within Orion's nebula lies a stellar nursery where new stars are born amidst swirling gas clouds—a breathtaking sight that ignites curiosity about the origins of life itself. Earthrise photograph immortalizes humanity's first glimpse at our home from space—an artwork that evokes awe and unity among all who behold it. The Pillars of Creation stand tall within the Eagle Nebula—a testament to nature's ability to sculpt extraordinary formations over millions of years. Nebula Sh 2-106 reveals its vibrant colors through an exquisite HST image, captivating us with its ethereal beauty. As we continue exploring these astronomical wonders, let us embrace both humbleness and wonderment—knowing that there is still so much left undiscovered beyond what meets our eyes.