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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

66 Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 129 pictures in our 66 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Tupolev and Chelomei, Moscow, 1980 Featured Print

Tupolev and Chelomei, Moscow, 1980

Alexei Andreyevich Tupolev (1925-2001, left), Soviet aircraft designer, and Vladimir Nikolayevich Chelomei (1914-1984, right), Soviet rocket engineer. They are Deputies of the USSR Supreme Soviet, and are talking during a break in the USSR Supreme Soviet's fourth session (tenth convocation). Tupolev, the son of the famous aircraft pioneer Andrei Tupolev, worked on the world's first supersonic passenger jet, the Tupolev Tu-144. Chelomei worked on rockets following World War II, including early cruise missiles and ICBMs. He later worked on the Soviet space programme. Photographed in 1980, in Moscow, Russia.

© RIA NOVOSTI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Fashion and Beauty - Miss Liverpool Maureen Martin - London Featured Print

Fashion and Beauty - Miss Liverpool Maureen Martin - London

Maureen Martin, Miss Liverpool 1966, wears a leather outfit designed by Helen Anderson on arrival at Euston Station in London. The coat, in spongeable glace leather, has a fluted collar and cuffs. Maureen, 21, was met by Liverpool MP Bessie Braddock.

© PA/Press Association Images

66, Archive, Archivenewscans2015, Archivenewscansoctober2015, Beauty, Britoct19th23rd2015, Brityear1966, Brochure, Coat, Liverpool, London, Pa121427, Printstoreok, Printstoreok1, Promotion, Queen, Tourism

Dmitri Mendeleev and Bohuslav Brauner Featured Print

Dmitri Mendeleev and Bohuslav Brauner

Dmitry Mendeleyev and Bohuslav Brauner. Mendeleyev (left, 1834-1907) was a Russian chemist, while Brauner (1855-1935) was a Czech chemist. Mendeleyev is famous for his work on organising trends in atomic weights and valency. From this work, he developed the first true periodic table of the elements (final version published in 1871). This contained some gaps, but new elements were later discovered to have the properties predicted by the table. Brauner worked on the same problems, and in 1902 he extended the periodic table downwards beyond lanthanum, predicting the existence of a new element between neodymium and samarium. Photographed in Prague, Czechoslovakia, on 1 April 1900.

© RIA NOVOSTI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY