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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

21st Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 321 pictures in our 21st collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico Featured Print

Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico

^BCave of Crystals.^b Geologist in the Cave of Crystals (^ICueva de los Cristales^i) in Naica Mine, Chihuahua, Mexico. The crystals are the largest known in the world, and are formed of the selenite form of gypsum (calcium sulphate). They formed over millions of years in the mineral-rich geothermally heated water that filled the caves. The crystals were discovered after the water was pumped out of the mine. The Cave of Crystals is 290 metres deep, and was discovered in 2000. Above it, 120 metres deep, is the Cave of Swords (^ICueva^i ^Ide^i ^Ilas Espadas^i), which was discovered in 1912. The crystals in this cave are smaller as its water cooled more rapidly

© JAVIER TRUEBA/MSF/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Apollo 16 lunar rover, artwork Featured Print

Apollo 16 lunar rover, artwork

Apollo 16 lunar rover. Artwork of the US astronaut John Watts Young (born 1930) driving a lunar rover on a performance test run on the Moon's surface. During this mission, Young achieved a lunar wheeled vehicle speed record of 18 kilometres per hour. Apollo 16 landed two astronauts in the Descartes Highlands for just under three days, from 21-24 April 1972. The other crew member for the lunar landing module (Orion, upper right) was US astronaut Charles Duke, who filmed this scene. Young and Duke carried out three excursions on the lunar surface, and collected over 90 kilograms of lunar rocks

© RICHARD BIZLEY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Warfare in the future - as predicted in 1932 Featured Print

Warfare in the future - as predicted in 1932

An impression of what warfare might look like in 2032, as predicted by The Modern Boy magazine in 1932. It suggests that invading troops might attack via a shell, with bumpers to save the shock of landing. The accompanying caption also advises, The men will have to be strapped up in special spherical tanks inside the shells so that they will remain upright however much the shell twists about during its journey through the atmosphere. As shells usually become red-hot owing to the speed they travel, the fellows inside will also need a bit of ice-cream with em to prevent them from frizzling like bacon in a pan! It concludes by saying, We certainly all ought to be glad this is only a forecast - at present. Date: 1932

© Mary Evans Picture Library