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Afghan School Gallery

Choose from 77 pictures in our Afghan School collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Leather Afghan waterbottle, 1842 circa (leather) Featured Afghan School Image

Leather Afghan waterbottle, 1842 circa (leather)

5924798 Leather Afghan waterbottle, 1842 circa (leather) by Afghan School, (19th century); National Army Museum, London; (add.info.: Leather Afghan waterbottle, 1842 circa.
Water was vital for any soldier on the march in Afghanistan. After relieving the besieged British garrison at Jalalabad in April 1842, Major-General Sir George PollockA's A'Army of RetributionA stopped there for several weeks in debilitating heat. Outbreaks of cholera threatened to overwhelm PollockA's force. This bottle is not British issue and was acquired as a trophy by a British soldier during the ArmyA's stay there.); A© National Army Museum ; Afghan, out of copyright

© © National Army Museum / Bridgeman Images

Field Marshal HRH George William Frederick Charles, 2nd Duke of Cambridge Featured Afghan School Image

Field Marshal HRH George William Frederick Charles, 2nd Duke of Cambridge

5925111 Field Marshal HRH George William Frederick Charles, 2nd Duke of Cambridge, 1862 circa (oil on canvas) by Lucas, John (1807-74); National Army Museum, London; (add.info.: Field Marshal HRH George William Frederick Charles, 2nd Duke of Cambridge, Commander-in-Chief of the Army, 1862 circa.
Oil on canvas by John Lucas (1807-1874), 1862 circa.
The Duke of Cambridge (1819-1904) became a field marshal in 1862, an event probably commemorated by this portrait. Cambridge was a warm, kind man, with a remarkable capacity for hard work and a passion for military traditions. His morganatic marriage to the actress Louisa Fairbrother, thereafter known as Mrs FitzGeorge, was never officially recognised, but he was buried beside her at Kensal Green Cemetery rather than in the royal vaults at Windsor Castle.
The eldest grandson of King George III and the last to die, Prince George of Cambridge was a cousin of Queen Victoria. He entered the British Army in 1837, serving with various regiments in Gibraltar, England and Ireland. He succeeded his father as 2nd Duke in 1850. The Crimean War (1854-1856) provided his long-awaited opportunity for active service. In 1854 he commanded the British 1st Division, but his leadership of this formation at the Battle of the Alma was questionable and showed his lack of field experience. He was also present at the battles of Balaklava and Inkerman, where he showed conspicuous bravery and had a horse shot under him. Invalided back to Britain with exhaustion at the end of 1854, he was mentioned in despatches and received the thanks of Parliament.
For 39 years, from 1856 to 1895,the Duke of Cambridge was Commander-in-Chief of the Army, and completed nearly 60 yearsA military service before he was forced to retire. Although keenly interested in the ArmyA's organisation and administration, he was opposed to many of the reforms introduced during the 1870s and 1880s.); A© National Army Museum ; English, out of copyright

© © National Army Museum / Bridgeman Images

Smoothbore muzzleloading wall or prow cannon, taken at Kabul, 1842 (metal and wood) Featured Afghan School Image

Smoothbore muzzleloading wall or prow cannon, taken at Kabul, 1842 (metal and wood)

5924255 Smoothbore muzzleloading wall or prow cannon, taken at Kabul, 1842 (metal and wood) by Afghan School, (19th century); National Army Museum, London; (add.info.: Smoothbore muzzleloading wall or prow cannon, taken at Kabul, 1842.
This swivel-gun was taken as a trophy by the British A'Army of RetributionA that occupied Kabul in September 1842 towards the end of the 1st Afghan War (1839-1842). The barrel is metal reinforced with wood, making it relatively light for its strength. This and the metal pintle, or prong, suggest the gun was intended to be portable and mounted on a wall. Major-General George PollockA's force departed from Kabul with 44 pieces of Afghan ordnance, but most had to be destroyed and abandoned because they were too large and heavy.); A© National Army Museum ; Afghan, out of copyright

© © National Army Museum / Bridgeman Images