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Choose from 776 pictures in our N collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured N Print

Henry Clay

Henry Clay. A formal campaign portrait of Whig presidential candidate Henry Clay, after the painting by John Neagle done at Ashland, Clay's estate in Kentucky. As this print's legend states, the original was painted by the order of Philadelphia Whigs and with the approbation of the Central Clay association. The engraver, Philadelphia artist John Sartain, was the most able and distinguished mezzotintist of the period. His Henry Clay, although a much larger and more expensive production than the usual campaign images (see nos. 1844-1 through -10), must have attracted considerable election-year interest. The Library's impression was deposited for copyright on December 16, 1843, by which time Clay had emerged as the Whig party's obvious, if not official, presidential nominee. The print's message is conveyed through text and iconography. Below the image are two quotes from Clay speeches: (1) The colors that float from the mast-head should be the credentials of our seamen. And (2) I shall stand erect with a spirit unconquered, whilst life endures, ready to second the exertions of the people in the cause of Liberty, the Union, and the National Prosperity. The statements embody the candidate's commitment to the defense of American commerce and the preservation of a strong federal union. The iconography of the portrait also reflects Clay's political values and achievements. The subject stands before a large column, and gestures toward an American flag and a globe turned to show South America. The globe alludes to Clay's support, during his early career in the House of Representatives, of Latin American insurgents and new republics. (To an 1843 public it may also have been an oblique reference to the proposed American annexation of Texas, formerly part of Mexico, which Clay opposed.) Clay's role as a champion of internal improvements and of American industry and agriculture (and perhaps his more recent endorsement of a protective tariff--extremely popular with Pennsyl Henry C

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10600824

Featured N Print

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS, 1861. The 7th Regiment of New York volunteers marching on Broadway on their way to the Pennsylvania Station and on to Washington, D.C., 19 April 1861, at the beginning of the American Civil War. Oil on canvas by Thomas Nast, 1869

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS, 1861.
The 7th Regiment of New York volunteers marching on Broadway on their way to the Pennsylvania Station and on to Washington, D.C., 19 April 1861, at the beginning of the American Civil War. Oil on canvas by Thomas Nast, 1869.

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America, American, Blonde, Boy Friend, Cartoon, Dress, Early, Farewell, Fashion, Girl Friend, Guitar, Held, John, Junior, Luggage, Men, Milk Jug, Racket, Roaring Twenties, Romance, Stocking, Straw Hat, Water Color, Women, Young

Featured N Print

Black John of Tetcott, James Northcote (1746-1831)

Oil on canvas, English School. In 1784 Northcote painted the portrait of John Arscott (1718-1788) of Tetcott, Devon, and it is probable that he painted this portrait of 'Black John' of Tetcott at same the time. Black John was under four foot in height and suffered from kyphosis, known at the time this portrait was painted as 'hunchback'. The descriptions of his life, spent in the service of John Arscott, record his success as a 'jester' and his devotion to his 'master'. It was common for servants lives to be overlooked and trivialised by the households they worked for and for their histories to be re-written, ensuring that they had no voice of their own. For example, it was noted that "his role as jester included swallowing and retrieving strings of live mice and 'mumbling' sparrows, removing their feathers with his teeth while the sparrow was in his mouth. He died of grief shortly after his master." There is no history of Black John's life (not even a record of his real name) that is not in relation to that of his 'master'. James Northcote was born in Plymouth, the son of a watchmaker and optician. He was apprenticed to his father's trade but showed a talent for art. In 1769 he left his father's work and set up as a portrait painter. He was admitted as a pupil into the studio and house of Sir Joshua Reynolds in London as a pupil and assistant between 1771 and 1776. He came to consider himself an authority on his master and in 1813, after Reynolds' death, he published his posthumous Memoirs of Sir Joshua Reynolds.

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