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George Cruikshank Gallery

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Choose from 499 pictures in our George Cruikshank collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Humour rain umbrella St. Swithin 19th century cartoon Featured George Cruikshank Print

Humour rain umbrella St. Swithin 19th century cartoon

This is a cartoon etching by the well-known Victorian social caricaturist / cartoonist George Cruikshank (1792 - 1878), dated November 1st, 1829. (1829 is in the reign of William IV, but most of Cruikshank's artistic work was in the long reign of Queen Victoria.) Cruikshank went on to illustrate a number of the books of Charles Dickens. Title: St. Swithin, Patron Saint of Umbrella makers. Singing: Long to Rain over us'. Description: If it rains on St. Swithin's Day (July 15 ), or so the saying goes, then it will rain for forty days and forty nights. Cruikshank sees this as a benefit for business, for the manufacturers of umbrellas. St. Swithin (St. Swithun) is shown showering two watering cans on his victims, while riding a flying dolphin that spouts a deluge from its mouth and nostrils. Under a large umbrella, the people of Britain dance and sing Long to rain over us, combining a homage to the rain and the reign of the king (William IV). The rendering of the dolphin is usual for this time since they were looked upon as fish. Designed Etched & Published by Geo. Cruikshank a?? Novr. 1st 1829

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Humour smuggler punches preventive man 19th century cartoon Featured George Cruikshank Print

Humour smuggler punches preventive man 19th century cartoon

This is a cartoon etching by the well-known Victorian social caricaturist / cartoonist George Cruikshank (1792 - 1878), dated November 1st, 1829. (1829 is in the reign of William IV, but most of Cruikshank's artistic work was in the long reign of Queen Victoria.) Cruikshank went on to illustrate a number of the books of Charles Dickens. Title: Black Eyed Sue the bold smuggler - and Will Watch the look out man Speech bubble: I should like to catch you overhauling my pockets indeed!! - You calls yourself a preventive man don't you Mr. Dummy? Now I'll lay you a crown that you can't prevent me from giving you a good dab of the chops. Description: Cruikshank makes a play on the term preventive man'. The preventive men were watchers on the shore who looked to intercept smugglers. An on-line reference says the era of the preventive men began in 1831, but this joke pre-dates that by a couple of years. Designed Etched & Published by Geo. Cruikshank - Novr. 1st 1829 More cartoons by George Cruikshank

© Whiteway

Humour comment The New Police Act 19th century cartoon Featured George Cruikshank Print

Humour comment The New Police Act 19th century cartoon

This is a cartoon etching by the well-known Victorian social caricaturist / cartoonist George Cruikshank (1792 - 1878), dated November 1st, 1829. (1829 is in the reign of William IV, but most of Cruikshank's artistic work was in the long reign of Queen Victoria.) Cruikshank went on to illustrate a number of the books of Charles Dickens. Title: The New Police Act Additional text: The FINISH Description: In 1829 Britain saw The Metropolitan Police Act, an Act of Parliament introduced by Sir Robert Peel. The Act replaced the former system of parish constables and watchmen with the Metropolitan Police of London. This is often considered to be the first modern police force, and its members took their name from the Act's founder - bobbies or peelers'. Cruikshank's cartoon hints at the resentment that followed the setting up of such a body of men. Designed Etched & Published by Geo. Cruikshank - Novr. 1st 1829 More cartoons by George Cruikshank

© Whiteway