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Archaeolemuridae Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 48 pictures in our Archaeolemuridae collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Orion constellation Featured Archaeolemuridae Print

Orion constellation

Orion constellation. Orion, the hunter, is one of the best known constellations in the sky. Orion's belt is formed of three bright stars in a row, from left to right, Alnitak, Alnilam and Mintaka (Zeta, Epsilon and Delta Orionis respectively). At upper left is the red supergiant Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) while at lower right is the white supergiant Rigel (Beta Orionis). Below the belt is the sword of Orion, which contains the Orion nebula (M42), which is visible as a pink patch. Two bright stars in neighbouring constellations are also seen: at bottom left is Sirius (Alpha Canis Majoris) in Canis Major, and at upper right is Aldebaran (Alpha Tauri) in Taurus

© Eckhard Slawik/Science Photo Library

Optical image of the star Sirius Featured Archaeolemuridae Print

Optical image of the star Sirius

Sirius. Optical image of the star Sirius, the brightest star in the sky, with the exception of the Sun. North is at top. Sirius (Alpha Canis Majoris), also known as the Dog Star, lies in the constellation of Canis Major. It has a visual magnitude of -1.46. It is itself a fairly average star, however, and only appears so bright due to its proximity to Earth. It lies around 8.6 light years away, making it the 9th nearest star to the Sun. Sirius is actually a double star. It has a very faint companion, Sirius B, which is a white dwarf. Sirius itself has the spectral class A1, meaning it is a very hot white star, with a surface temperature around 10, 000 degrees Celsius

© JOHN SANFORD/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Sirius binary star system Featured Archaeolemuridae Print

Sirius binary star system

Sirius binary star system, Hubble Space Telescope image. Sirius A (centre, Alpha Canis Majoris), in the constellation Canis Major, is the brightest star in the night sky and only 8.6 light years from Earth. It has a very small, faint companion, Sirius B (small dot at lower left). Sirius B, only 12, 000 kilometres in diameter, is a white dwarf star, the collapsed core of a star. Normally, the companion star would be obscured by the brightness of its companion, but Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 instrument was used to locate the star, and other instruments were then used to measure the gravitational redshift of its light, and hence its mass. Sirius B has a mass 98% of that of our Sun. The results were published in December 2005

© H. E. BOND/E. NELAN/M. BARSTOW/M. BURLEIGH/J. B. HOLBERG/NASA/ESA/STScI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY