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Sea Raven Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 25 pictures in our Sea Raven collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Coast of Mendocino, 1872. Creator: J. G. Smithwick Featured Sea Raven Print

Coast of Mendocino, 1872. Creator: J. G. Smithwick

Coast of Mendocino, 1872. Rock arch on the shore of the Pacific Ocean, California, USA. Nothing can be more tumultuous or less pacific than the waters of the Pacific Ocean along the Mendocino coast...the waves are twelve feet high and a mile in length, and advance with a solemnity of motion which words cannot describe...the boiling fury with which they crash upon the beach and churn the sands is, at first sight, appalling. Around such isolated rocks as those presented by the artist they rage and raven...they have worn the cliffs into strange and wondrous forms, beating out caverns where the lower part is conglomerate rock, and series of arched cellars, into which tuns of sea-weed and debris are thrown...they have invariably scooped out the soft rock, making all kinds of mystic arches, siren rings, and gateways of Poseidon'. From "Picturesque America; or, The Land We Live In, A Delineation by Pen and Pencil of the Mountains, Rivers, Lakes...with Illustrations on Steel and Wood by Eminent American Artists" Vol. I, edited by William Cullen Bryant. [D. Appleton and Company, New York, 1872]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Mr Punch thanking Marconi for wireless telegraphy which was saving lives at sea, 1913. Artist: Leonard Raven-Hill Featured Sea Raven Print

Mr Punch thanking Marconi for wireless telegraphy which was saving lives at sea, 1913. Artist: Leonard Raven-Hill

Mr Punch thanking Marconi for wireless telegraphy which was saving lives at sea, 1913. Marconi (1874-1937) discovered a way in which waves could be used to send messages from one place to another without wires or cables. Having read about Heinrich Hertz's work with electromagnetic waves, he began experiments of his own, and in 1894 successfully sounded a buzzer 9 metres away from where he stood. In 1902 Marconi sent a radio signal across the Atlantic in Morse code. Five years later, a Canadian scientist, Reginald Fessenden, transmitted a human voice by radio for the first time. Marconi's inventiveness and business skills made radio communication a practical proposition. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1909. Cartoon from Punch, (London, 22 October 1913)

© Oxford Science Archive / Heritage-Images