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Discus Gallery

Choose from 71 pictures in our Discus collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Poet and discus thrower, Mlle. H. Konopacka Featured Discus Print

Poet and discus thrower, Mlle. H. Konopacka

Halina Konopacka (1900 - 1989), famous athlete and the first Polish Olympic Champion (1928, Amsterdam). She took part in the Olympic Games in Amsterdam, where she won a gold medal in discus throw, breaking her own world record. This was the first women's gold-winning track and field event in the Olympics. She was also known in Poland for her poetry according to the caption. What a gal. Date: 1928

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

The Discobolus of Myron, 1908. Creator: Unknown Featured Discus Print

The Discobolus of Myron, 1908. Creator: Unknown

The Discobolus of Myron, 1908. Le Discobole De Myron'. The Discobolo di Castelporziano, a plaster composite reconstruction after the Lancellotti Discobolus, made by Professor Giulio Emanuele Rizzo in 1907, with elements from various other discus thrower sculptures: the head of the Massimi Discobolus (in the National Roman Museum in Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Rome), the right arm from that in the Casa Buonarotti in Florence, and the feet from the Townley Discobolus in the British Museum in London. The Lancellotti Discobolus, or Discobolus Palombara, discovered in 1781, is a 1st-century Roman copy of Myron's original bronze, made in Greece the 5th century BC. From "La Revue De L'Art - Ancien et Moderne" - Volume XXIV, July-December 1908, [Paris, 1908]

© The Print Collector/Heritage Images

Durga Slaying Mahisha, c. 1700-1710. Creator: Unknown Featured Discus Print

Durga Slaying Mahisha, c. 1700-1710. Creator: Unknown

Durga Slaying Mahisha, c. 1700-1710. Durga is the name of the goddess who personifies the sum total of the powers of all the male gods combined. When she vanquishes the fierce buffalo demon named Mahisha, she is described as having many arms, each holding a different weapon: bow and arrow, trident, discus, shield, sword, mace, and the conch shell that sounds the start of battle. The horizontal lines on her arms are sectarian markings. At the moment depicted in this painting, she has succeeded in beheading the buffalo demon and shooting arrows into his true form that climbs from its neck. Artists in the foothills of the western Himalayas, where this work was made, depicted Durga's mount as a tiger--lions and tigers had synonymous meaning throughout India as emblems of shakti, or divine creative energy

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images