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King Vulture Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 57 pictures in our King Vulture collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Bribri Indian Shaman & Conical House, Costa Rica Featured King Vulture Print

Bribri Indian Shaman & Conical House, Costa Rica

The Head Shaman of the Bribri People of the Talamanca Province, Costa Rica - pictured in front of the Conical House. The Bribri spiritual practice is centred on the conical house. These structures can be found in many Amazonian groups belonging to the Macro-chibchan language family. The conical house is a symbolic representation of the universe. It is supported by eight pilars symbolizing the animals that helped Sibu construct the Universe. The house has four levels representing the four levels of the world, being the ground level the plane we inhabit. On the second level dwell the spirits of plants and animals, and the owners of the rivers, this is where Sibu's helpers live. On the third level of the universe live the spirits who cause disease and suffering and descend periodically to cause grief on earth. The final and highest level of the conical house is where Sibu, accompanied by his helper the king of vultures lives. In this same level live the most malignant spirits as well. The Bribri explanation for this is that Sibu keeps them enclosed there, like a warden keeps the inmates in a prison. There are also three other levels beneath the world we inhabit. One of them is the place where Bribri souls go after death. Date: circa 1910s

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection

Ostracon: Ramesses II Suckled by a Goddess, c. 1279-1213 BC. Creator: Unknown Featured King Vulture Print

Ostracon: Ramesses II Suckled by a Goddess, c. 1279-1213 BC. Creator: Unknown

Ostracon: Ramesses II Suckled by a Goddess, c. 1279-1213 BC. Ostraca (singular, ostracon) are natural limestone flakes, common to the region of Thebes. The ancient Egyptians who lived there, particularly the artisans of the royal tombs, used them extensively as writing or drawing surfaces, both for practice and for instruction. Some are almost finished works of art; others are clearly sketches. Whether passing idle time or practicing their technique, these pieces provide a rare look at an ancient artist at work. This ostracon is decorated with a scene of the king suckled by a goddess. Although his body is that of an adult, the king (identified by the inscriptions as Ramesses II) appears child size. The goddess wears a long garment of vulture's wings--she could be any of a number of protective mother or sky goddesses

© Heritage Art/Heritage Images

The curtain box from the burial of queen Hetepheres, wife of king Sneferu and mother of Cheops Featured King Vulture Print

The curtain box from the burial of queen Hetepheres, wife of king Sneferu and mother of Cheops

The curtain box from the burial of queen Hetepheres, wife of king Sneferu and mother of Cheops. Against the gold background the name of the king is highlighted in white within the name-ring. To left and right the vulture-goddess Nekhbet and the cobra-goddess Wadjyt offer the shen-ring to the king. Country of Origin: Egypt. Culture: Ancient Egyptian. Date/Period: Old Kingdom, 4th Dynasty 2600-2500BC. Material/ Size: Wood gilded with gold copper, silver, faience and ebony 18.5 x 21.5 x 157.5 cm Credit Line: Werner Forman Archive/ Egyptian Museum, Cairo . Location: 39

© Werner Forman Archive / Heritage-Images