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Home > All Images > 2016 > July > 12 Jul 2016

Images Dated 12th July 2016

Available as Framed Photos, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 167 pictures in our Images Dated 12th July 2016 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) against snowy forest, Bear River Range, Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Utah, USA Featured 12 Jul 2016 Print

Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) against snowy forest, Bear River Range, Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Utah, USA

Douglas fir, with the scientific name Pseudotsuga menziesii, is an evergreen conifer species native to western North America. The common name honors David Douglas, a Scottish botanist and collector who first reported the extraordinary nature and potential of the species. Extant coast Douglas fir trees 60-75 m (197-246 ft) or more in height and 1.5-2 m (4.9-6.6 ft) in diameter are common in old growth stands, and maximum heights of 100-120 m (330-390 ft) and diameters up to 4.5-6 m (15-20 ft) have been documented. The rooting habit of coast Douglas fir is not particularly deep, with the roots tending to be shallower than those of same-aged ponderosa pine, sugar pine, or California incense-cedar, though deeper than Sitka spruce

© Scott T. Smith/Danita Delimont

North american Indian illustration 1859 Featured 12 Jul 2016 Print

North american Indian illustration 1859

The natural history of the human species; its typical forms, primaeval distribution, filiations, and migrations

© Roberto A Sanchez

546429752, Antique, Chief, Community, Engraving, Etching, Illustration, Indigenous Culture, Native American Ethnicity, North America, North American Tribal Culture, North Dakota, Old, Vertical

Morty the dog, mascot of WW1 Featured 12 Jul 2016 Print

Morty the dog, mascot of WW1

Morty, the property of Lieut.-Colonel W.A. Murray, R.F.A. He went to France in August 14, and remained there the whole war, being continuously in the front line. Wounded once, and badly gassed, he wears two wounded stripes on his collar. He killed 300 rats at Passchendaele, and finally marched into Cologne, tail up, at the head of his brigade. Now living, full of scars and honours, at Bembridge, Isle of Wight

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans